November challenge: my very favourite small poems that blew my socks off

Our second November challenge (we had two as it is the last challenge of the year) was to write small poems.

I loved reading these. I loved the way you showed how many different things you can do with  a handful of words.

Small poems can be busy or simple.

Small poems can sound good and look good.

I also loved the poems that told little stories.

 

t h e s e    p o  e m s

b   l   e   w

m y             w  i n t e r       s  o  c  k  s

 

o     f     f       !

 

I have picked just a HANDFUL to post but I LOVED  them all.

I am sending a copy of The Letter Box Cat to Jack and a book of Laura Ranger’s poems she published when she was a child to Erica.

Tomorrow I will post my poetry challenges for the summer holidays.

 

h  a p  p y   p o e m     d a y s    – thanks wonderful young poets!

 

Haiku

Rain drives leaves off trees

Blocking drains and causing floods

Puddles become lakes

Gemma L, Age 10, Year 6, Adventure School

 

Three short poems from Daniel:

 

Small Poem

We need to protect the sea

Or there will be nothing left to see

Do you see my point

 

Haiku (my first time doing Haiku – I used the book you sent us J )

The rain lashes down

The region now an island

In a moat of mud

 

The Big Wet

It rained and rained and rained

And blocked up all the drains

Flooding all around

No one could get to town

But walking in the wet is cool

So I packed my bag and went to school

Daniel, Age 8, Year 3, Adventure School

 

 

 

Summer

Salty chips

Salt sticks

By Jack F, Age 10, Year 5, Methven School

 

The underground

The pebbles on the cracked brown concrete
rattles as the train comes to a screeching halt
beside the yellow line.

Erica B, Selwyn House School 13 Years Year 8

 

Playing in the waves

Splashing

Sprinting

Panting

Breathless

By Ella M, Age 10, Year 5, Methven school

 

The Golden Castle on an Island

A shiny

Golden castle

Stands

On a sandy island

A boy

Makes a rainbow

Like the sun

 

By Lily P, 7 years old, Ilam School

 

 

London House

The tall

London house,

as old as the stone

in it’s fireplace,

with its warm,

pine tree smell.

Isis W, Selwyn House School, Year 8, Age 13

 

Fiji

Fiji,
the clear ocean,
little waves crash on my toes.

Maddie S, Selwyn House, Year 8, 12 Years old

 

Raratonga

The sun illuminates the the roof of the sea
stretching out towards the coral.
The relaxing hum of the waves
lures me into the water.

Emma C, age 11, Year 7, Selwyn House, Christchurch

 

Germany

Excitedly as I bound up the steps and hug my grandparents,

My other relatives come up the steps.

When we come to my grandparents I look through the back fence.

There’s the neighbour’s dog as usual.

Our visit was as special as my birth.

Xenia, age 9, Fendalton School

 

The tree

Stretches its branches into the sky

It plays with children as they grab its branches

It’s so tough with a mighty heart

Surprising a loud Hack!

And it falls

Down

Down

Down. . .

By: Iris H, Fendalton Open Air School

 

 

Patterns

Triangle, square, circle.
Triangle, square, circle.

Patterns, shapes,
In my head, on my paper.
Repeating around,
Echoing around,
Patterns, patterns,
Never disappear.

Ysabella H Year 5 Age: 9 Ilam Primary School

 

Ko Sumi

The island is as yellow as
an autumn tree.
Fish ride waves at night.
They are nippy hunters.

By Josh P Age 12 Medbury School

Poetry Box Summer Poems for the first day of Summer

 

Today is officially the first day of summer – I look out my window and see little patches of blue sky – I see my vegetable garden growing crazy fast with all the rain – I see our cats rolling on the warm gravel – I see our dog Molly sleeping in the shade.

I love every season.

I am always sad to say goodbye to winter because I love fires and winter food.

I am always happy to say hello to summer because I love swimming at the beach – eating summer fruit and veggies – wearing shorts and Tshirts – doing heaps of things outside.

 

Thanks for ALL the wonderful summer poems. I filled with a summery mood reading them all.

I have picked JUST a few to post. I am sending a copy of The Letterbox Cat to Ms McNaughton’s class at Methven School as they sent in a terrific bunch of summer poems. Thanks also to all the poem bundles sent by teachers from Adventure School, St Patrick’s School and Huapai School. Wonderful. Great job poetry fans!

I am also sending a copy to Kingston.

 

t h a n k  y o u    f o r    k i c k i n g    o f f

s u m m e r       w i t h     p o e m s

x    P a u l a

 

 

 

 

Summer

O the wonderful activities of summer

Surfing and swimming,

Playing in the sun.

And O the wonderful foods of summer

Hotdogs and ice-cream,

We’ve barely begun.

Yet, the most wonderful things of summer

Are family and friends

Having lots of fun.

By Andy A, Age 10, Year 6, Methven School

 

A day in the life of a crab

As the light peeks through my castle

It’s time to re-enter the seaside

The sun greets me

People with hats

Kids splashing

Barbeque’s burning

Pohutakawa swaying

My nippers are ready

For a curious kid

A nosy adult

An intrigued tourist

 

As the sun fades

The people have gone

I’m alone once more

The waves spill their last

I return to my castle.

By Emily W, Age 10, Year 6, Methven School

 

Fish ‘n’ chips

Stuck inside paper

A burst of light

A feel of a hand

Touches my crispy batter

Chips surround me

Handful after handful

Blood red sauce smothers

An open cavity

A row of teeth

I go down a black hole

By Jack F, Age 10, Year 5, Methven School

 

Winter’s Escape

I see

the white-caped waves

washing up

my newly made

golden sandcastle

I feel

the heat of the sand

burning my back

By Cooper P, Age 10, Year 5 Methven School

 

 

Summer

Spring ends
And summer starts
Flowers bloom
Animals play
Babies are born filling the fields’
The sweet scent of summer filled the air
Children swarm out the door
Every one including me
The golden sand tickles my feet
I know that summer is here!

Emma, age 9, Fendalton School

 

 

Summer

Summer
beaches waves so cold,
there
is an ice cream now it’s sold.
Seagulls
soaring through the sky,
Summer
clouds never cry.
Waves
are crashing,
and
the fish are splashing.
Pink, purple,
yellow
and green
all
the colours going together
that
make summer better.
Views
so nice drinks with ice.
Summer’s
sun so bright,
it
takes the dark away at night.
Cool
pools not too deep,
this
is my summer to keep.

Madeline, age 9, St Patrick’s School, Masterton

 

Summer

Summer
in the sun and I’m ready to have some fun.
Under
the sparkling waves getting out to look at caves.
Eating
a refreshing bun out of the sun.
Celebrations
in the sun bringing  joy to everyone.

Mirron, age 11, St Patrick’s School, Masterton

Summer
The birds are chirping sweet songs,
butterflies are flying in the clear air,
the grass is green freshly mowed,
chicks grow their sweet soft feathers,
hearing the sounds make me joyful,
strawberries are out yummy,
in the park.

Name Umi Age :10 School: Ilam School

 

Kaikoura
Christmas time has come
Lobster on the table
Trains pass, we wave
Waves crash on the shore,
10 meters from the house.
Spiders lounge in surrounding woods
Blue house
Meg, border collie rushes, chasing air.
Red house, right next door.
Renters stay, we take the precious moments, before we move out.
Paua shells litter the ground.
The smell of a beach, salty, fresh,
The buzzing of stingless bees,
Pick them up,
Play with them,
Observe them.

Lucy J, 13 years old, Selwyn House School. Lucy sent this poem in before the earthquakes.

 

 

The Beach
Down on the beach
is a big tall tree.
Waves blowing onto the sand
And people surfing at the beach.
Watery sand
in the big calm sea.
Seagulls flying
across the blue sunny sky.
Dogs chasing
the big green ball.
Spiders at the car
spinning their spider webs.
Sand castles,
blown by the sand
And waves bowling them away.

Down on the beach
people are climbing
the big tall tree.
Waves blowing to the sand
and people surfing in the calm sea.
Seagulls flying
across the big blue sky.
Let’s have a
good time at the beach.
by Jennifer, age 8, Year 3, Huapai School

 

Summer

I can swim in shallow water.
When I touch the bottom of the water,
it feels muddy.
When I smell the muddy sand,
it smells like a pot of rubbish.
When I touch the sand, it feels sticky.
When I put water on my hand,
and I put sand on my hand,
the sand will stick
on my hand.

by Kingston, Year 1, Huapai District School

 

Summer

Horizontal rain pelts against the windows

Wild winds push like bullies

People put on puffer jackets

Yeah… it’s summer in Wellington

Gemma L, Age 10, Year 6, Adventure School

 

 

 

The Stargazing Rock

Around the corner, up behind the house
Where the bending willows grow
Across the glistening stream
On a cool summer evening
The stars all a shine
The grass soft and dewy
The maples in a line
With a skip and a hop
And a wade through the stream
You can get to the stargazing rock

Not in winter
When even the stars shimmer with cold
When the stream is high
And the current strong

Only in summer
When the water is low
And warm to bare toes
The grass is soft
The ferns new
The rock still slightly warm
And the farm is laid out
Below your feet like patchwork
You can feel it’s a magic night

Bring the blanket
And the lemonade
We might want some chocolate
We’ll be caught if we try for the ice cream

Put it in the basket
Check our parents aren’t looking
Off we go

Keep up
Duck the brambles
Almost there
Don’t trip
Here we are

Now at the top
Spread out the blanket
Pass around our stolen treats

When the clock strikes midnight
And the shadows are long
Bare feet patter and twirl
Beneath the heavens
Filled with stars

But morning is upon us
It’s time to sneak home
We don’t want to get caught
So back to bed we go
Sylvie, Sapphira and me

But now Sylvie’s grown too old
For such games
And Sapphira’s moved to Nepal
So now there’s none at all
To go up on a summer night
None except for me

by Sarah-Kate S, age 11, homeschooled

 

 

 

 

 

Some poems with pictures from Y1 and 2 at Adventure School:

by Cyrus:

Screen Shot 2016-12-01 at 9.07.36 AM.png

 

by Luca:

Screen Shot 2016-12-01 at 9.05.13 AM.png

 

 

 

by Shawn:Screen Shot 2016-12-01 at 9.02.40 AM.png

Valu:

Screen Shot 2016-12-02 at 4.00.41 PM.png

Poetry Box catchup: the November challenges and writing from the earthquake

Dear young poetry fans,

It has been a hard week for so many in New Zealand. I have loved reading all the stories of human kindness. I love the way we back each other when things get tough.

If you know classes or children that might like to write poems from the earthquake (doesn’t have to be on the earthquake) I have comfort book packs to send out. I am posting and sending as I get them.   Please write From the earthquake in the subject line.

Under this are my TWO November challenges.

Take care dear young poets.

x Paula

 

Writing from the Earthquake (please share)

I have invited children and classes to share experiences. I have already posted some poems.

You might write about the sounds, what moved, what it reminded you of. You might write about something good that happened like I did (see below). You might try writing a really really small poem or a longer poem with lots of details.

You might want to write about something else to take your mind off things like shudders and storms.

send to paulajoygreen@gmail.com Include name age year school. I will have The Letterbox Cat for some children and a comfort packs  of books for others (books are comforting too!). I will post some on NOW ON and during the following weeks.

 

 

T h  e      N o  v e m  b e r      c h a l l e n g e s

 

 

Challenge Number One: a set topic

Try writing a poem about summer.

Before you write hunt for summer things.

Use your senses to find words.

Make a chain of interesting summer words. Pick your favourites to put in the poem.

Link three summer words together. Make a pattern poem with summer words.

Hunt for a summer memory.

Imagine a summer you would love.

Paint a picture of summer with words.

Listen to every line and do a sound check.

Find some sizzling summer similes to use.

Hunt for things you to do in summer or eat.

What about the place you like to go in summer?

What is your favourite summer mood? Write a poem and hide that mood in the poem for me to guess.

 

 

Challenge Number Two: small poems

I love writing poems that use only a handful of words.

Every word has to count.

Your poem might paint a little picture.

Does it sound good?

You could try writing a couplet poem: just two lines that might hide or use tricky rhyme or no rhyme.

You could try writing a haiku: 3 lines and can be 5 syllables, 7 syllables, 5 syllables (doesn’t usually rhyme).

You could try writing a limerick.

You could write a small poem that is surprising.

You could write a small poem that is funny.

You could write a small poem that is thoughtful.

You could write a small poem that makes a pattern with words.

 

 

SEND your poem to paulajoygreen@gmail.com

DEADLINE Monday November 28th

Include your name, age, year and name of school. You can include your teacher’s email if you like.

P l e a s e    p u t   ‘Summer poem’ or ‘Small poem’ in the subject line of your email.

I will pick some favourites to post on the blog and have a book for at least two readers and maybe even a book for a class.

I will do two posts on  Wednesday 30th November.

 

Serval cat poem

Just posting this for a child who wants to recite it at school tomorrow. It is from my book Flamingo Bendalingo. My partner Michael did the cool illustrations.

I wrote these poems so long ago.

I am feeling rather excited as I have nearly finished writing a first draft of poems using titles I collected from you all on my Hot Spot Poetry Tour of New Zealand a few years ago.

…. it has taken me ages!

 

IMG_3725.JPGI

Children write from the Earthquake: ‘Enormes Shaks!’

The other day I invited children experiencing quake shudders in New Zealand to write some poems. I have posted the invitation below in case you are in the mood to write. I will be sending out some comfort book packs.

 

Franka wrote this almost-acrostic poem the morning after the earthquake. She goes to Newtown School in Wellington and is six. Her mum wrote the version under it.

 
Enormes Shaks!

Enormes Shaks!
Ratl the wendos
Todles are shaking
Hot fies berning out
Chilgrin in bed awak
Anamls are fritid
Kitty croching low
Shated glas ol ova walitin
Intresting stores on the nwse
No! It’s to shaky.
Lowahat is in danga.
O how scry
Repd blbings ant sath!

by Franka Moleta, 14 November 2016

Enormous Shakes!
Rattle the windows
Toddlers are shaking
Hot fires burning out
Children in bed awake
Animals are frightened
Kitty crouching low
Shattered glass all over Wellington
Interesting stories on the news
No! It’s too shaky
Lower Hutt is in danger.
Oh, how scary
Ripped buildings aren’t safe.

 

 

 

 

Writing from the Earthquake

You might write about the sounds, what moved, what it reminded you of. You might write about something good that happened like I did (see below). You might try writing a really really small poem or a longer poem with lots of details.

You might want to write about something else to take your mind off things like shudders and storms.

send to paulajoygreen@gmail.com Include name age year school. I will have The Letterbox Cat for some children and a comfort packs  of books for others (books are comforting too!). I will post some on NOW ON and during the following weeks.

Children write from the Earthquake: ‘Earthquaked Animals’ and ‘Mother Nature’s Wrath’

The other day I invited children experiencing quake shudders in New Zealand to write some poems. I have posted the invitation below in case you are in the mood to write. I will be sending out some comfort book packs.

 

Gemma and Daniel sent this letter and their poems in this morning:

 

Hi Paula

Here are Daniel’s and my earthquake poems.  It has certainly been an exciting time with shakes and floods and tornadoes.  But now we are feeling a bit over it and exhausted!

Thank you for giving us the chance to write about it.  Daniel has been writing lots about the earthquake because it really helps him.

From Gemma (and Daniel)

 

 

Earthquaked Animals

 

Stranded cows surf on a new island

Sheep gone forever

A colony of seals looks for a new home

Dazed dogs lost and confused

Hens keep their eggs to themselves

Birds refuse to sing

 

And at my house

A little cat is glued to my side

Pointed ears up

Eyes glowing like headlamps

 

By Daniel L, age 8, Adventure School, Whitby

 

 

 

Mother Nature’s Wrath

 

Mother Nature

Enraged by how we treat our earth

Shakes us like a milkshake

Trying to make us understand

Then she cries

Her tears flood the broken earth

She sighs in desperation

Her breath tears trees from their roots

Her fury not finished

Until we have been put firmly in our place

 

By Gemma L, age  10, Adventure School, Whitby

 

 

 

Writing from the Earthquake

You might write about the sounds, what moved, what it reminded you of. You might write about something good that happened like I did (see below). You might try writing a really really small poem or a longer poem with lots of details.

You might want to write about something else to take your mind off things like shudders and storms.

send to paulajoygreen@gmail.com Include name age year school. I will have The Letterbox Cat for some children and a comfort packs  of books for others (books are comforting too!). I will post some on NOW ON and during the following weeks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

You might write about the sounds, what moved, what it reminded you of. You might write about something good that happened like I did (see below). You might try writing a really really small poem or a longer poem with lots of details.

 

You might want to write about something else to take your mind off things like shudders and storms.

You just might not be in the mood. That’s ok!

 

send to paulajoygreen@gmail.com Include name age year school. I will have The Letterbox Cat for some children and a comfort packs  of books for others (books are comforting too!). I will post some on Friday 18th November and during the following weeks.

Young poets who felt the earthquake: An invitation to write poems if you are experiencing shudders and wet times (and my comfort poem for my daughter)

I’ve decided to share some comfort book packs ….

 

Sometimes when I feel really bad about something, when I am tired and I can’t seem to find the right thing to do, I like to write a poem. Writing a poem gives me great comfort.

With so many of you experiencing terrible aftershocks and terrible floods, I thought it would be really really lovely to share some poems.

 

If you want to write a poem about what you felt during the quakes I will share it.

 

You might write about the sounds, what moved, what it reminded you of. You might write about something good that happened like I did (see below). You might try writing a really really small poem or a longer poem with lots of details.

 

You might want to write about something else to take your mind off things like shudders and storms.

You just might not be in the mood. That’s ok!

 

send to paulajoygreen@gmail.com Include name age year school. I will have The Letterbox Cat for some children and a comfort packs  of books for others (books are comforting too!). I will post some on Friday 18th November and during the following weeks.

 

 

My daughter lives in Wellington and her flatmate had moved out so she was on her own and had to walk out into the dark by herself because of the tsunami warning.  I stayed awake with her all night so she could text me. A poet I know (just a little bit) offered to go and pick her up. I was so moved.

 

Earthquake

A super moon and the water

sucks back in the dark.

My daughter walks up

the hill alone.

I am waiting.

A poet offers

to get her

and take her

to the warm

but she finds

some earthquake

friends and watches

the night and waits.