My big walk and a gigantic machinery challenge for you all to do with a cool prize

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Hope you had a lovely Labour Weekend! I went for a huge two-and-half hour walk around our country roads (actually I did it twice!). There are lots of hills and some are extremely steep which is always fun. It took me an hour to get to the station so I had an ice cream at the shop.

Most of the days though I read which I think is BLISS!

When I was at the beach last week I saw some gigantic bits of machinery that were all set to work on the road. I thought it would be great to do some machinery poems – especially diggers, and graders and steamrollers. It is always fun thinking up similes and sounds to use in machine poems. But I decided this was a golden opportunity to play with verbs (action or doing words).

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So I invite you to write a poem about a road machine. Make a list of all the verbs you can think of that fit your road machine. Verbs can give a poem zing and zest. Play with how you put them in the poem. You might just use one or two verbs that shine out or you might use LOADS of verbs. Over to you. You can even include a drawing that I could post too.

Send your poem to me by Thursday November 7th. Include you name, age, year and name of school. You can include your teacher’s name and email address if you like.

I wil post some of my favourites, but I will pick one poem to award a special prize to thanks to Scholastic. They have sent me a little blue bag containing five Little Digger books by Betty and Alan Gilderdale. These books are classic New Zealand picture books. The stories have such a good rhythm they BEG to be read out loud, time and time again. They are like a poem story or a story poem (‘So they got a bigger digger/ but the bigger digger stuck’). The rhyme is like the engine of a train because it keeps the story moving with a clackety clackety clack! I think there is an essential spot on every child’s bookshelf reserved for these books. Five little treasures, I say. Thank you Scholastic.

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