Monthly Archives: May 2020

Poetry Box popUP challenge: 2 Kiwi and Ruru poems

 

9780143773146

 

The Midnight Adventures of Ruru and Kiwi  Clare Scott, illustrated by Amy Haarhooff (Penguin Random House)

 

I loved this book so much I invited you to write a poem using the title – you had 48 hours.

These two little gems arrived. I am sending a copy of the book to Denzel thanks to Penguin Random House.

I am posting my June challenge tomorrow.

 

 

The Midnight Adventures of Ruru and Kiwi

The Midnight Adventures of Ruru and Kiwi
Take place under the old Totara tree
Ruru and Kiwi gaze at the sky so black
As they enjoy a tasty snack
Kiwi says I love being a night time bird
But daytime birds think it’s a bit absurd
Together they dance in the moonlight
That shines with the stars so bright

By Denzel  Age 8 Sandspit Road School

 

 

 

Ruru and Kiwi

 

Ruru and kiwi

Went out in the dark

On a beautiful, starry night

They took homemade wings

And a few other things

‘Coz kiwi wanted to take flight

 

Ruru and kiwi

Climbed a great hill

Up to the highest peak

Ruru jumped and flew fast

But in the end kiwi passed

He’d put holes in the wings with his beak!

 

Ruru and kiwi

Laughed themselves silly

For thinking they should be the same

Kiwi had his own skills

And Ruru feared thrills

So they shook wings, then went home again

 

Daniel L (Age 11, year 7, Hadlow School)

 

 

Penguin Random House page

 

 

 

 

Poetry Box May challenge: Russley School’s astonishing Bubble Time poems

 

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The sea making bubbles at Bethells Beach / Te Henga

 

To wrap up my Bubble Time on Poetry Box I invited children to write a poem to show someone in the future what it was like to be in lockdown. None of us have experienced anything like it. Everything felt different. Some things become ever so much more precious and some things just didn’t matter.

Six students from Russley School in Christchurch sent me these poems. I have been posting lists of comfort books picked my New Zealanders on my other blog Poetry Shelf for three months (final one posted yesterday). I have read some extraordinary books since Level 4 but nothing has affected me as deeply as reading these poems.

I love the way the poems come from experience, from heart, from the most bewildering unsettling time many of us ever known. These poems sing, they have made me smile and almost cry. I am so grateful to have read them.

I am sending each young poet a copy of Groovy Fish.

 

 

T h e     s  e v e n    b u b b l e    t i m e     p o e m s

 

 

 

Best Bits of Bubble Time | by Finn B

 

Spending time with my dog

and sleep ins

going on more runs with my mum

running like a bolt of lightning

with my dog

 

chopping down a tree with a chainsaw

creeping up behind and scaring my Dad

he roared like a tiger

 

building a hut with chairs and pillows

rushing around my dad’s house

to chase my dog

like a bull shark swimming

at 10,000 kilometers per hour

 

 

 

My Bubble | By Henry P 7yrs

 

More schoolwork, no escape!

Yolks of an egg, in a bowl for baking.

 

Beds all cosy, lots of sleep-ins.

Underneath the hut roof we played.

Bits of leaves in my hair, from jumping in a leaf pile.

Bike rides on bumpy tracks.

Lego, lego, lego.

Everyday felt the same.

 

 

 

bubble time | Willow R

 

the worst thing that happened

in my bubble time

was having to stay with my sister all day

and not seeing my friends

 

that but I learned to shoot a hoop backwards

like a professional

 

I was flowing like a leaf in the air

I was flipping on the trampoline

like a champion.

 

 

 

Lockdown | Oliver P

 

When we went into lockdown,

I was sad and very happy

To spend time with all my family,

But I was also scared

 

I didn’t know what was happening,

I was worried for the world

But that didn’t stop me,

From having fun

 

For 6 long weeks,

I had to stay at home

No takeaways, no shops open,

I felt like it was never going to end

 

Me and My family did lots of things,

Playing board games and saving lots of money

At some point into lockdown

We even made some doughnuts

 

I knew this would be in history,

A concealed memory, deep down inside

We were doing well,

Just about there

 

With a few days to go,

We went back to school

Though things still weren’t normal,

I could still see my friends

 

 

 

Family Time | by James dW

 

Noisy dog yapping at

12pm like a smoke alarm

 

Irritating brother

yelling in my ear

like someone dragging a

chair across the ground

 

Extreme baking

like Nadia Lim

 

 

Bubble Time Fun | by Isaac E

 

Pouncing over the creek

at Crosbie Park like a jaguar

leaping for their prey

 

stretching my legs

after big tiring walks

like baby elephants

 

chucking the ball for the dog

like a bowling ball

 

dashing around the block

like Jesse Owens

 

 

 

Extreme Bubble Time | Annabelle K

 

Missing my friends was really hard

like Esther

she is one of my best friends

Esther is as beautiful as a shimmery star in the blue sky.

 

Searching for my brother and sister

like an owl hunting for scurrying mice hiding in a rubbish bin

Cooking like a master chef in a 5 star restaurant

acting like Patrick Dempsey

 

playing mum and dad with little sister (was not good)

climbing like a super spy up a tree

to get sight of the roof

(because there was a bird nest)

 

Hiding like a robber stealing precious jewels

in the eerie dark city.

Running like a super athlete

bolting across the sprinting track.

 

 

 

 

Poetry Box review: The Midnight Adventures of Ruru and Kiwi by Clare Scott and Amy Haarhoff plus 48 hour pop-up challenge and book giveaway

9780143773146

 

The Midnight Adventures of Ruru and Kiwi by Clare Scott, illustrated by Amy Haarhoff, Penguin Random House (Puffin)

 

Amy Haarhoff was the winner of Storyline’s Gavin Bishop Award for illustration. Amy and author Clare Scott are a match made in heaven because the illustrations and the writing sing together so exquisitely.

You have to peer deep into the midnight blue to see the ruru and kiwi. Their big eyes are glinting, the stars, moon and leaves on the trees luminous. Amy’s illustrations give me goosebumps – they are full of life and wonder and heavenly craft.

 

Clare’s sentences are equally mesmerising:

The ruru and kiwi went into the bush, wrapped snug in night’s velvety black. They took some runny mānuka honey tied up in a flax-woven sack.

Clare writes with the ear of a poet – a musician – so the words flow like honey on the page. Delicious! Sometimes it is the choice of a single word that brings a sentence and indeed the scene alive:

 

Stars prickled high in the sky

the bush was shadowed and still.

 

Prickled and shadowed are genius word choices – they sound good, they are a little bit surprising, and they strengthen the night setting. Sublime writing!

 

This is a book of friendship and sharing. If you have more than enough honey for two birds, it is clearly time to throw a party in the midnight blue. As a party of night creatures arrive (kauri snails, kiwi, pūriri moths, gecko, centipedes, frogs to name a few), Clare’s sentences turn to song with little lines repeating. The book is itching to be read aloud it sounds so good. Best of all the story makes you feel good – like you have just had a wonderful outing.

Book bonus: At the back of the book, you get to meet the night creatures up close and discover fascinating facts about them. This book is such a treasure – beautifully written, beautifully illustrated and lovingly published. It deserves a spot on your shelves, no matter how old you are. I see this becoming an Aotearoa classic. Ah, I just adore it to bits.

 

And side by side, with no need to hide

they danced by the light of the moon,

the moon,

the moon.

They danced by the light of the moon.

 

 

You can discover more about Amy and Clare here: Penguin Random House page

 

48 hour pop up challenge: Write a poem using the book title. You choose where your poem goes! Send to me by noon on Friday May 29th and thanks to Penguin Random House I will give a copy to one young poet.

 

send to  paulajoygreen@gmail.com

please include your name age and name of school

don’t forget to put RURU KIWI challenge in subject line so I don’t miss it

don’t put your surname on drawings or paintings or collages (Poetry Box policy)

 

kia kaha

keep well

keep imagining

 

 

 

 

 

Poetry Box bubble time: a very glad Gecko Press reading diary

 

 

 

Over the past few months I have been gobbling up books published by Gecko Press (along with others). I had planned on posting reviews of children’s books while we were in lockdown but I found it hard to write and my blog got so busy doing other things for children.

But these Gecko books were a wonderful escape hatch when I couldn’t leave my bubble. At the weekend I read them all again and realised what a comfort they were when my mind was so fuzzy. I was also intrigued to recall how I connected with them when the world was wobbly and full of unknowns and now, when our backyards feel a whole lot safer, I connect a little differently.

 

My Gecko Press Reading Diary

 

 

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A Bear Named Bjorn by Delphine Perret, Gecko Press

 

NOT MUCH HAPPENS IN A BEAR’S LIFE.

OFTEN BJORN DOES NOTHING AT ALL

BUT HE’S NEVER BORED,

 

First of all this is a medium-sized hardback, with black & white drawings, that fits in your hand perfectly (well when you are as old as me). Even before you start reading you know this book is a treasure. All the sentences are in capital letters (it’s is a growing trend!) which might seem odd but just adds to the perfectness of every choice the publisher and the designer made.

Secondly the drawings are like exquisite little poems so I ‘read’ those before I read the story. They have an EH Shephard feel (he drew for AA Milne’s books) but they have their own personality that could only ever belong to Delphine Perret.

Thirdly the story is magic. It felt just right to be reading this in lockdown because Bjorn is a big fan of catalogues and ordering things online (I began to order a few things online). Bjorn loves his cave (everything seems just right!) but one day a big delivery truck turns up with a ‘plump three-seater sofa’ that he has won. Unexpectedly. He is told the big red sofa will ‘change his life and make him very happy’. Hmmm!

When my delivery van turned up with fresh fish during lockdown I was very happy. When it turned up with scrumptious avocados I was also very happy. Change my life? Ah those advertising catalogues.

BUT by the time Bjorn got the sofa inside the cave, and his friends dropped by, his life wasn’t exactly changed in a good way. You will have to read the story to find out what the arrival of the BIG RED SOFA actually meant to Bjorn.

I loved this story because I read it at a time when I was thinking about what I needed in my life and what I wanted in my life. I have found myself being a whole lot less wasteful.

A Bear Named Bjorn got me thinking, but it also got me laughing! In one episode a catalogue inspires Bjorn and his friends to dress up like humans.

There are lots of ways I am reminded of Winnie the Pooh because this is a book of living, of ordinary everyday life that is full of friendship and wisdom and unexpected things. I love it so much.

 

REALLY? IT’S THAT TIME? THIS MORNING

THERE’S A CHANGE IN THE AIR.

YOU CAN SMELL IT IN THE LEAVES

PILING UP AT THE FOOT OF THE TREES,

IN THE FAINT WHIFF OF MUSHROOMS.

THAT’S IT, THE SAME AS EVERY YEAR.

EXCEPT, NOT EXACTLY.

 

 

Hattie_Cover_LR

Hattie by Frida Nilsson, illustrated by Stina Wirsén, Gecko Press

 

This is what it says on the back of the book:

Hattie lives just outside of nowhere, right next to no one at all.

I love this – it intrigued me and made me pick up the book and start reading AT ONCE!  Hattie was waiting for school to start and she just couldn’t wait. Again I ponder on the chords between real life and the book I am reading. In lockdown I felt like I lived on the edge of nowhere and the somewheres were so topsy turvey. All the children were walking up and down our country road keeping an eye out for teddies and fascinating things because schools were closed.

AT LAST SCHOOL! Hattie loves school but she does like to bend rules. Playing horses ends up with someone locked in the school shed which ends up with her mother sad which ends up with the new banana fabric for the old chair abandoned on the floor which ends up with Hattie running away to the forest which ends up with:

Up in the sky small cold stars shine, but on the ground it’s as dark as the underworld.

What happens next  …. you will have to read and found out yourself – except I will say the banana-fabric chair gets finished.

The episodes in Like A Bear Named Bjorn will make you laugh – especially the dumpling cake one which was not exactly the sweet cake Hattie was expecting – but you know Hattie she likes to bend the rules. She manages to avoid eating it. Another day Hattie plays a mean trick and Richard throws up but is she to blame? And can you imagine what happens when Hattie goes to the hairdresser and asks for ‘tufts’?

An extra favourite scene: Papa suggests making a gingerbread house at Christmas but then decides the duck house outside would be easier. They argue and then compromise: a simple duck house with gingerbread ducks on the roof. Meanwhile Hattie’s mum likes to make tottering Norwegian cakes that are almost as tall as Hattie. Ah my tummy filled with glee! Yet the best bit of this gingerbread episode is an act of kindness.

I also love this book to the moon and back. The edge of nowhere is a very good place to spend time when our world is still a bit wobbly. Hattie reminded me of audacious Pippi Longstocking – but Hattie is her own extraordinary self, and she’s excellent company.

 

 

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The Wolf and the Fly by Antje Damm, Gecko Press

 

A nifty board book that is both a story and a memory game. Wolf is so hungry his tummy is rumbling. On the page opposite are eight things he might eat. Turn over and try remembering which one is missing. Wolf keeps eating one thing at a time and you have to keep remembering what he ate by being a very excellent memory detective.

How will it all end? Yes hungry wolf is now full wolf, but I didn’t exactly guess what happened next!

A very cool book.

 

 

My-Mama-cover-LR

My Mama by Annemarie van Haeringen, Gecko Press

 

I’ve known my mama for a long time.

For my whole life, actually.

 

My Mama is a big gorgeous hardback picture book with big gorgeous illustrations of elephant Mama, and sweet little illustrations of her rather mischievous child. The child is pretty much telling us everything mamas are good for (to climb up like a mountain or hide behind) and everything they are good at (parking the cars neatly in the toy box, hiding behind mama). This is a heartwarming read – the illustrations are divine – perfect when you need a feel-good book.

 

I really want to fly.

Mama says that you can do anything if you really want to.

It’s true. You can see I’m already good at it.

But my mama finds it hard to let it go.

 

 

All the Dear Little Animals cover

All the Dear Little Animals Ulf Nilsson, illustrated by Eva Eriksson, Gecko Press

 

Esther finds a dead bumble bee and decides the dead bumble needs a funeral. Her younger friend is scared of dead things but agrees to help. He is good at writing poems so writes a poem for the funeral. They bury the bee, make a cross, lay flowers, cry a little and say the poem. With the help of Esther’s wee brother, Puttie, they start a funeral home. It is hard finding dead things but they make funerals for  a mouse, a hamster, a rooster, a hedgehog, a bird. The young poet writes something especially for each sad occasion.

The story shows how important the things we do together at funeral time are, as are the things we choose to do ourselves.

 

I hope you pick at least one book from here to fill you with joy

 

t h a n k   y o u  G e c k o   P r e s s

 

 

 

 

Poetry Box review: Kiwi Baby by Helen Taylor

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Kiwi Baby Helen Taylor, Penguin Random House 2020

Pīpī Kiwi Helen Taylor, Penguin Random House 2020

 

 

Kiwi Baby is a treasure of a book. Kiwi Iti wakes up to discover an egg next to him, so he goes hunting for his dad, Kiwi Nui. He has a load of questions building up. His dad is very very very patient and answers everything with a dash of wisdom and a sprinkle of love.

The beautiful illustrations are as simple as the writing is economical. With Helen’s deft hand, the kiwi and his dad become exquisitely alive on the page. Adorable!

The book is about kiwi but it is also about asking questions and about giving answers – about being a dad and about being an offspring.

The kiwi dad finishes his answer with: ‘these things take time’.

That feels like something I say every morning when I wake up at the moment. Patience is a good thing.

 

‘When Baby wakes up, will she play with me?’

‘Not yet,’ Kiwi iti.’

‘I know,’ screeched Kiwi Iti,’ these things take time!’

 

Some story books fill you with a warm glow and this book is one of them. I won’t spoil the ending and the magic of reading your way through (I hate reviews that do that!) because I want you to find your own copy of the book and fill with a warm glow too! Happy reading!

Oh, and wonderfully, you can also get a version in te reo: Pīpī Kiwi.

 

Helen Taylor is an award-winning children’s illustrator and artist living ‘in an old yellow house on a red-boned hill in the portside town of Lyttelton’. Her books include A Booming in the Night (with writer Ben Brown) and Kakapo Dance.

 

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Poetry Box at Level 2 and May’s challenge

 

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rural teddy

 

 

Thank you so much to all the children’s authors who helped me create daily posts while we were in lockdown, in our bubble time.

Thank you to all the children who tried challenges, watched videos, listened to audios and sent in mahi. It was wonderful to read and view your creativity.

Poetry Box is returning to usual schedule.

On the first day of the month I will post a poetry challenge.

On the last day of the month I will post some mahi from that challenge.

In between I will post book reviews, videos, audios, and 48 hour popUP challenges.

 

 

A MAY CHALLENGE

 

People are going to write about BUBBLE TIME and LOCKDOWN for a long time. We are always part of history because history is about ordinary lives as much it is about the lives and actions of important people like Prime Ministers and scientists and explorers.

Reports will be written. Questions will be asked. Art will be made. Music created. Stories and poems written. We have been and are still part of a significant world event.

For the rest of May I invite you to write or create something as a RECORD of your BUBBLE time.

 

You could write a poem or a suite of poems.

Think about where you were. Imagine you are describing the time to someone in the future.

What were the best things you did?

What were the worst things?

Write a poem about one particular thing or loads of things.

Did you do anything you don’t usually do?

 

You could do a series of drawings or paintings.

You could make up a song and record yourself singing it.

You could make a little video.

You could write a letter to the future or to someone who wasn’t in your bubble. (or to me)

You could show someone in the future what it was like for you to be in your bubble.

What did you find hard?

What did you find fun?

What did you miss?

Did you gain anything from your experience?

 

I will post mahi from this challenge on Sunday 31st May.

I will have some books to give away.

 

send to  paulajoygreen@gmail.com

please include your name age and name of school

don’t forget to put NAME OF challenge in subject line so I don’t miss it

don’t put your surname on drawings or paintings or collages (Poetry Box policy)

 

kia kaha

keep well

keep imagining

 

 

 

Poetry Box bubble time – some favourite mahi by children

 

 

Our hungry cats: Charlie and Agile

 

On Monday I will let you know how Poetry Box will work in the next levels. I will have more books to give away and more challenges and will post more work from you all.

It has been such fun creating loads of bubble-time posts and reading (and listening and watching) all the things you sent me.

Here are some things that arrived in my box this week.

I am sending copies of Groovy Fish to all these children as it is the last bubble-time post: Eddie, Liam B, Reuben, Lillia, Henry P, James and Paige.

It is not a competition but I just pick some children as I love sharing books!

 

 

Moon Poems

 

What is the moon?

 

They say the moon is like swiss cheese

But I think it is more like these:

It is like a cookie with sugary icing

Or like a cake in need of slicing

Sometimes the moon is as round as a plate

Other times as thin as the tooth of a rake

The moon can be like a giant’s eye

Yet at the same time be like a pie in the sky

The moon is as certain as the sun

And the moon is as comforting as my mum

 

Daniel L (Age 11, year 7, Hadlow School)

 

 

Be something else in a poem

 

The Nightlight

I light up

Whenever you come near

My energy radiating outwards

Swallowing up the shadows

That might scare you

I sleep during the day

And I work in the night

Waiting, ready to be of service

So if you need my help

Don’t be dim

Just flick the switch

And I will be there for you

 

Daniel L (Age 11, year 7, Hadlow School)

 

 

Cat Poems

 

Daisy

I’m a bossy

little

creature

 

I drink my

owner’s milk

from her

cereal

 

I make

her brush my

fur with

her hairbrush

 

I attack

her toes

at night

 

I like eating

tuna and

bacon

 

I am Daisy

 

The

Super

Bossy

 

Cat

 

by Ella-Rose E (Year 8, Russley School)

 

 

 The Knitting Cat

hi. I am the knitting cat.
I am playing with my owner’s knitting wool.
Because I have learned to knit.
You take those sticky things and you wrap the wool around it!
Oh.
It is a lot harder than it looks.
But I will manage!

Or not.

OI! Owner! Can I have some help getting out of here???
please???

The Van Clan children

 

Cat

Creeping down the hall,

Out of sight

Making a lot of noise,

In the night

Dancing on the roof,

Hold on tight

It’s your little kitten,

THAT CAN BITE!

 

Eabha D (12 yrs Russley School)

 

 

Mingles, My Pet Cat

His feet are as white as snow

He has radar ears that flicker to any sound

Slithery tail like a snake

His eyes are as green as freshly grown grass

which light up when I rattle his food

 

by Liam B (11yrs Russley School)

 

 

Millie

My cat

has a friend

 

She’s called Lluna

and my cat Millie

admires her

 

They play a lot

climbing  menacing trees

darting between scruffy bushes

catching unsuspecting birds

together

forever

 

Until

we moved

 

I know Millie misses Luna

maybe we’ll visit sometime

But for now

Millie will just have to make some more friends

 

Reuben V (Year 8 Russley School)

 

 

Explaining a Cat to an Alien

 

Welcome to earth

this is a cute cat

A cat is a tiny skeleton wrapped in fur

They have triangle ears like illuminati symbols

 

There is a long bone that sticks out of their behind,

when they walk past it tickles

They have eighteen keen claws to scratch a couch

Cats have tiny white teeth for crushing mouse skulls

 

Their glowing eyes can cut through the dark

No matter what height they fall from

they always settle on four landing pads

They sound lethal but they are only awake

for 37 minutes everyday

 

by James dw (age 8 Russley School)

 

 

 The Prowler Of Night

She prowls around like a burglar

and slips through fences like a bar of soap

 

With pointy ears and a long smooth tail

her Midnight coat makes her invisible to human eyes

 

Long whiskers illuminate her face

her tail curls around branches

 

Her teeth shine in the moonlight,

as sharp as a gorse bush

 

The icy wind brushes against her coat of warm fur

she stalks her prey like a jaguar

 

Her yellow eyes sparkle like a sapphire

she leaps high like a pogostick

 

When the sun begins to rise from the east,

she sneaks back through her catflap

and snuggles up to sleep on the soft cushions on Mum’s chair

 

by Oliver Peters (9yrs Russley School)

 

GREYGRIZZLEDOG

She howls like the wind,

As grey as an hb pencil,

She purrs like a train engine,

She’s as still as a statue

As wiggly as a worm

Her eyes are like cameras capturing everything we do

But she is my cat and I love her to bits!

 

by Lillia P (10yrs, Russley School)

 

 

 

Things That Wake You in the Night

 

Things that wake me in the night

 

The loud sound of dogs barking

fills my house.

Noisy cars

drive past my garden

like a freight train.

 

Shivering with fear, will a ghost pirate

attack me any minute now?

 

The clock strikes midnight,

like a giant ringing bell.

 

Spooky alien spaceships

swarm around my house,

shining their bright lights,

on my comfy, cosy bed.

I quickly pull up my warm covers,

safe as a caterpillar in a cocoon.

 

Has this all been a dream?

Or has it all been true?

 

I don’t really care because

I’m going back to sleep.

 

by Henry P (aged 7, Russley School)

 

 

Bird poems

 

Tūī

There was a tūī and it was old and free,

It came to my house to meet me.

The tūī and I went to Disneyland

Then we went to the beach and saw the sand.

A tūī’s as cool as a Lamborghini.

He looks like a white, blue and black Ferrari.
Charlie (7) St Francis School

 

Favourite bird

He has a white pom pom on his neck.

His feathers are inky black with green and blue.

His whistle is loud as a train at night.
Eddie (8) St Francis School

 

Kiwi

When you walk deep through the forest

Where kiwi live there

You find kiwi looking for food, with their long beaks

Out walking at night

Even though they have tiny wings, they still can not fly.

They have feathers and their big fur.

They have a small population

Hunting through the woods
Sebastien (9) St Francis School

 

Louie the Tūī

I am a tūī with a blue body

I like to play a musical tune

With a tweet and a cheep cheep

Look at me go as I sing my wonderful song

We hear you from afar

We hear you from close up

As we stand at nanas and papas house by a big puriri tree

You live in a forest calling your family with a skauk and a tweet!

When you sing it makes me think…

you are the greatest singing star ever!

 

Olivia (7) St Francis School

 

Parrots
P arrots are my favourite bird

A mazing and beautiful too

R ainbow coloured feathers that look like paintings

R eally clever because they can talk to you

O ne day you should go and I see some

T hey have them at the Zoo

S inging , squawking and whistling is their favourite thing to do.
Katija (8) St Francis School

 

 

 

Ocean poems: watch the video, write a poem, a day later add something to the poem

 

Ocean poem 1

Humming, swelling waves

Ripples of white caps

On the swirling surf

Seagulls stand

While waves caress the rocks

Water pushing in and out

Ocean breathing in and out

Under the same coloured sky

 

 

Ocean Poem 2

The ocean breathes in and out

Waves swelling up

And deflating again

The white caps lift up

To caress the rocky outcrop

While seagulls look on

Mesmerised by the ripples

As the water pulls back

Over their webbed feet

 

Daniel L (Age 11, year 7, Hadlow School)

 

 

A walk in the sea 

The stars twinkled in the midnight sky.

The lighthouse shone a bright glistening light to the ships.

The sapphire sea felt icy.

I walked across the golden velvety sand.

The waves were rolling in.

I picked up a watery shell.

It l was cold and it smelled of sea salt.

The ocean echoed in my ears

rushing and rocking

The breeze brushed my hair

as pohutukawa trees waved gently.

The sky slowly turned pink and orange

as the sun slowly woke up.

 

Natsukie H Year 6 Fendalton Open-Air School

 


The Sea

The sun gently warms us as we lie on the golden sands.

The blue sapphire sky is so bright above us.

 

We gaze at the beautiful sea, the sun’s reflection shining.

We begin to drift off to sleep.

 

Calm waves form and gently roll against the soft sand.

A sudden breeze delivers a smell of hot sausages

cooking on the barbecue.

 

Eliana G Year 6 Fendalton Open-air School

 

 

Moment

The salty breeze blows my hair out of my eyes

As darkness descends over the horizon

The rippling waves of the sea lap against my feet

Fish darting around the water

I wish I could stay in this moment forever.

 

Paige L Year 6 Fendalton Open-Air School

 

Going to the Sea

The waves were frantically swishing

like a jellyfish swinging it’s tentacles

I heard the seagulls soaring through the sky

The feeling of hot golden sand

squished through my toes

The sea water washed into my mouth

and it tasted like over salted chips

Next time,

I’ll have to remember my surfboard

 

By Willow (Year 3 Russley School)

 

 Ocean

Waves crash like a gif which is never ending

Rocking waves bring back bad memories

Feet submerging into squishy sand

My face goes green when the waves rock the boat

Soaring seagulls hitchhike on the ocean gust

Spiky sea urchins lurk under the treacherous ocean

The tide unexpectedly washes over my feet

Pale electric blue bottles wait to sting

The majestic sound calms everyone down

Dangerous rips call me out to sea

The whitewash reminds me of cream in hot chocolates

Beautiful, but dangerous

 

by James dW (age 8 Russley School)

 

 

Thank you!

Keep safe

Keep imagining

Kia kaha

Poetry Box bubble time: my final bubble time challenge

 

 

IMG_5572

 

Bethells Beach Te Henga

 

 

Dawn

 

Four house lights sparking in the valley dark.

Who will walk up their long rural driveways to stand

in silence for ANZAC Day?

 

In bubble time I wake up in the night

and I imagine the whole world is awake

wondering what night it is

 

but it is just me and I am figuring out

a story about a cat who lives on the moon

and I wondering how to make cheese

and how to make pasta parcels

or pasta butterflies

 

and how to plant seeds in the cold

and how to feel sad and glad

and how to thank all the kind people

and how to ignore all the mean people

 

and how to hug everyone who has lost a loved one

and how to thank Jacinda for listening

and how to write a poem

that is both sad and glad.

 

Paula Green

 

 

Today we move to Level 2 and next week schools will be opening on a wider scale so Poetry Box will also move to a new level.

Today I am offering a final bubble challenge.

Tomorrow I will posting some favourite mahi from you from the past week.

On Monday I will post a new Poetry Box schedule.

 

A FINAL BUBBLE CHALLENGE

People are going to write about BUBBLE TIME and LOCKDOWN for a long time. We are always part of history because history is about ordinary lives as much it is about the lives and actions of important people like Prime Ministers and scientists and explorers.

Reports will be written. Questions will be asked. Art will be made. Music created. Stories and poems written. We have been part of a significant world event.

Today I invite you to write or create something as a RECORD of your BUBBLE time.

 

You could write a poem or a suite of poems.

Think about where you were. Imagine you are describing the time to someone in the future.

What were the best things you did?

What were the worst things?

Write a poem about one particular thing or loads of things.

What were the worst thing?

Did you do anything you don’t usually do?

You could do a series of drawings or paintings.

You could make up a song and record yourself singing it

You could make a little video.

You could write a letter to the future or to someone who wasn’t in you bubble/

You could show someone in the future what it was like for you to be in your bubble.

What did you find hard?

What did you find fun?

What did you miss?

What did you gain from your experience?

 

I will post mahi from this challenge on Friday  22nd May.

I will have some books to give away.

 

send to  paulajoygreen@gmail.com

please include your name age and name of school

don’t forget to put NAME OF challenge in subject line so I don’t miss it

don’t put your surname on drawings or paintings or collages (Poetry Box policy)

 

This is the last week for Bubble time – see what happens next week!

 

You can still try these Poetry Box activities. Click on links below:

 

Watch my picture poems and try some.

Watch my moon poems and try some yourself.

Watch my ocean video and try my two-poem sea challenge!

Read Richard Langston’s lighthouse and tree poems and write as though you are something /someone else.

Listen to Paula read her cats poems and offer cat and things-that-wake-you-in-night activities

Listen to Elena de Roo’s BIRD poems and try my Bird challenge

Tell about a book you have loved in bubble time.

Richard Langston reads his red poem with colour activities

Sacha Cotter and Josh Morgan’s magnificent videos and The Bomb activities

write or draw something for your favourite library or bookshop

Listen to Ashley (8) read: try my dinosaur, pets and swip swap challenges

Have fun with SOUNDS, muck around with WORDS

Listen to Amelia (8) read 3 poems from The Treasury and try my activities

Listen to Philippa Werry read her poem and try her simile challenge

Make a memory album or page

Try my lost-wonder challenges and listen Sarah Ell’s new book Lost Wonders!

Loads of MAKING ideas inside and outside

Do something rainy or snowy! Watch me read my rain and cold poems from The Letterbox Cat

Listen to Melinda Szymanik read her alien mother story and try your own

Send me pictures, photos or poems of curious things you see on your walks

Listen to Maisie and I read fish poems and invite you to do fishy things

Listen to my unpublished very very very strange tail story and do some illustrations for it or invent your own strange tail!

Try writing a postcard poem from where you’d like to be!

Mixed up animals and hear Paula read ‘Anifables’ poem

Sally Sutton’s magic hat challenge

Celebrate your hero and listen to Barbara Else read

Tell me about your favourite bookshop or library

Try my Pass the Poem challenge with friends and family by phone or email

Write draw video comic strip letters poems stories about being in your bubble

My cloudy challenges and hear my cloud poem

My thank our supermarket workers challenge

Listen to me read Aunt Concertina and offer a cool challenge

Listen to me read my poem ‘Lick Lick Riff’ dog poem and offer a doggy cat tiger bat any animal challenge

Check out David Hill’s wonderful photo challenge

Listen to Swapna Haddow read her book and try a rabbit challenge

Try Johanna Aitchison’s hunt the teddy challenges

Ruth Paul reads her muddy poem and I offer muddy challenges

 

 

kia kaha

keep well

keep imagining

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Poetry Box bubble time: watch my picture-poem video and make some yourself!

 

 

I almost didn’t post this video! The sound of my own voice is always so weird – let alone a video. I was really tired when I made it yesterday and it shows!

This is my second-to-last bubble time post.

BUT I love making poems where the words make pictures. You could also call it concrete poetry, shape poetry or visual poetry. You can track examples of this right back to the time of the Greeks.

 

I invite you to use words to make pictures.

You can choose what you call it.

Collect words first and work on your poem phrases and lines.

Make sure they sound good.

Word patterns can be fun as in my snowboard poem.

Will you add a surprise to your poem?

Give your picture poem a title.

 

send to  paulajoygreen@gmail.com

please include your name age and name of school

don’t forget to put NAME OF challenge in subject line so I don’t miss it

don’t put your surname on drawings or paintings or collages (Poetry Box policy)

 

There is no deadline while we are living in our bubbles! Every Friday I will post some work by children.

I will always answer your emails but not straightaway. If I haven’t replied after 3 or 4 days nudge me as I may have missed it.

I will have at least one book to give away each Friday.

 

 

You can also try these Poetry Box activities. Click on links below:

 

Watch my moon poems and try some yourself.

Watch my ocean video and try my two-poem sea challenge!

Read Richard Langston’s lighthouse and tree poems and write as though you are something /someone else.

Listen to Paula read her cats poems and offer cat and things-that-wake-you-in-night activities

Listen to Elena de Roo’s BIRD poems and try my Bird challenge

Tell about a book you have loved in bubble time.

Richard Langston reads his red poem with colour activities

Sacha Cotter and Josh Morgan’s magnificent videos and The Bomb activities

write or draw something for your favourite library or bookshop

Listen to Ashley (8) read: try my dinosaur, pets and swip swap challenges

Have fun with SOUNDS, muck around with WORDS

Listen to Amelia (8) read 3 poems from The Treasury and try my activities

Listen to Philippa Werry read her poem and try her simile challenge

Make a memory album or page

Try my lost-wonder challenges and listen Sarah Ell’s new book Lost Wonders!

Loads of MAKING ideas inside and outside

Do something rainy or snowy! Watch me read my rain and cold poems from The Letterbox Cat

Listen to Melinda Szymanik read her alien mother story and try your own

Send me pictures, photos or poems of curious things you see on your walks

Listen to Maisie and I read fish poems and invite you to do fishy things

Listen to my unpublished very very very strange tail story and do some illustrations for it or invent your own strange tail!

Try writing a postcard poem from where you’d like to be!

Mixed up animals and hear Paula read ‘Anifables’ poem

Sally Sutton’s magic hat challenge

Celebrate your hero and listen to Barbara Else read

Tell me about your favourite bookshop or library

Try my Pass the Poem challenge with friends and family by phone or email

Write draw video comic strip letters poems stories about being in your bubble

My cloudy challenges and hear my cloud poem

My thank our supermarket workers challenge

Listen to me read Aunt Concertina and offer a cool challenge

Listen to me read my poem ‘Lick Lick Riff’ dog poem and offer a doggy cat tiger bat any animal challenge

Check out David Hill’s wonderful photo challenge

Listen to Swapna Haddow read her book and try a rabbit challenge

Try Johanna Aitchison’s hunt the teddy challenges

Ruth Paul reads her muddy poem and I offer muddy challenges

kia kaha

keep well

keep imagining

 

 

 

 

Poetry Box bubble time: listen to my moon poems and try moon challenges

 

 

 

 

Paula Green reads moon poems from Macaroni Moon (Random House) and Groovy Fish ( The Cuba Press)

 

Moon challenges

 

Find some moon facts and hide them in a poem

Collect moon words and make a moon poem pattern

Use one of my poems and write your own version

Write a poem about the moon and SOMETHING ELSE!

Write a poem using fresh moon similes

Write a poem that is moon imaginative

Write a poem that is moon real

Write a funny moon poem

Write a serious moon poem

Do a moon illustration

Do a moon comic strip

Record your moon poem

 

HAVE FUN!!!!

 

 

send to  paulajoygreen@gmail.com

please include your name age and name of school

don’t forget to put NAME OF challenge in subject line so I don’t miss it

don’t put your surname on drawings or paintings or collages (Poetry Box policy)

 

There is no deadline while we are living in our bubbles! Every Friday I will post some work by children.

I will always answer your emails but not straightaway. If I haven’t replied after 3 or 4 days nudge me as I may have missed it.

I will have at least one book to give away each Friday.

 

 

You can also try these Poetry Box activities. Click on links below:

 

Watch my ocean video and try my two-poem sea challenge!

Read Richard Langston’s lighthouse and tree poems and write as though you are something /someone else.

Listen to Paula read her cats poems and offer cat and things-that-wake-you-in-night activities

Listen to Elena de Roo’s BIRD poems and try my Bird challenge

Tell about a book you have loved in bubble time.

Richard Langston reads his red poem with colour activities

Sacha Cotter and Josh Morgan’s magnificent videos and The Bomb activities

write or draw something for your favourite library or bookshop

Listen to Ashley (8) read: try my dinosaur, pets and swip swap challenges

Have fun with SOUNDS, muck around with WORDS

Listen to Amelia (8) read 3 poems from The Treasury and try my activities

Listen to Philippa Werry read her poem and try her simile challenge

Make a memory album or page

Try my lost-wonder challenges and listen Sarah Ell’s new book Lost Wonders!

Loads of MAKING ideas inside and outside

Do something rainy or snowy! Watch me read my rain and cold poems from The Letterbox Cat

Listen to Melinda Szymanik read her alien mother story and try your own

Send me pictures, photos or poems of curious things you see on your walks

Listen to Maisie and I read fish poems and invite you to do fishy things

Listen to my unpublished very very very strange tail story and do some illustrations for it or invent your own strange tail!

Try writing a postcard poem from where you’d like to be!

Mixed up animals and hear Paula read ‘Anifables’ poem

Sally Sutton’s magic hat challenge

Celebrate your hero and listen to Barbara Else read

Tell me about your favourite bookshop or library

Try my Pass the Poem challenge with friends and family by phone or email

Write draw video comic strip letters poems stories about being in your bubble

My cloudy challenges and hear my cloud poem

My thank our supermarket workers challenge

Listen to me read Aunt Concertina and offer a cool challenge

Listen to me read my poem ‘Lick Lick Riff’ dog poem and offer a doggy cat tiger bat any animal challenge

Check out David Hill’s wonderful photo challenge

Listen to Swapna Haddow read her book and try a rabbit challenge

Try Johanna Aitchison’s hunt the teddy challenges

Ruth Paul reads her muddy poem and I offer muddy challenges

kia kaha

keep well

keep imagining

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