Category Archives: Poetry

Some poems by children to celebrate NZ poets in the reissued Treasury

 

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Thanks for sending all the poems in – it was fun reading them all. I am sending a copy of The Treasury to Gabriella.

Extra thanks to Churton Park School for sending all the pop popping poems in! I loved them.

 

 

Paperclip
(a reply to Elizabeth Smither’s “The Stapler”)

Paper clips are nice to paper
not like any nasty staple
Can hold a lot of paper
5 or 6 its favourite number
Wants to end the staple families.

Paper clips can connect and bend
They are paper’s best friend
Easy to collect with a magnet
Never tears or rips the paper
Paper clips are best, not staples

By James K    Age 11, Year 6  Churton Park School

 

The scissors
As in response to ‘The stapler’ by Elizabeth Smither

What a ferocious beasts are scissors
With blades that ruin knickers
They do not like to feed on snickers*
They do not like large rocks

They must have two sheets at least
Or else they can’t be deceased
They prefer more at least four
As when you cut up a story.

 

*as in the chocolate bar
Gabriella R age 10, Year 6  Churton Park School
Note: There are ones similar, but these are all my ideas. By the way I put deceased there as in getting worn out.

 

The Scissors
In Response to Elizabeth Smither’s ‘The Stapler’

What a strange beast are a pair of scissors
With sharp blades that ruin pictures
They have an appetite for stickers
They do not like cardboard

Over time the things it can cut
Begins to be not as much
It does not care how many sheets
It will tear up your story

Nathan S Year 6    Churton Park School

 

 

Wiggly Wiggly

Wiggly, Wiggly,
Do the harlem
Wiggle a jellyfish,
Touch a marlin.

Wiggly, Wiggly,
Bend a worm,
Twist a leg,
Squirm a berm.

Wiggly, Wiggly,
Twist a head,
Break a led,
¨Oh! No!¨ he said

Wiggly, Wiggly,
Kiss a frog,
Buy a dog
Climb through fog.

In response to Joy Cowley’s Wriggly Wriggly

Ryan L 11 years old   Year 6   Churton Park School

 

 

Inspired by Joy Cowley:

Muddly Muddly

Muddly Muddly
feed a cat
It wears a hat
Big and fat
Muddly Muddly
Feed a cat

Muddly Muddly
Feed a dog
Eat a hotdog
Than take a jog
Muddly Muddly
Feed a dog

Muddly Muddly
Feed a horse
Use the force
Become the source
Muddly Muddly
Feed a horse

Muddly Muddly
Feed a kiwi
Wee wee
Very sneaky
Muddly Muddly
Feed a kiwi

By Angad Gill, Churton Park School, Year 6

 

To Joy Cowley

Muddly Muddly,
Feed a horse,
Give it a tomato,
Make a sauce,
Eat it up,
With some paws,
Put it down,
On the floors,
Feed a horse

Muddly Muddly,
Feed a dog,
In it’s bowl,
Feed it hogs,
Eat them up with,
Some Hogs,
Muddly Muddly,
Feed a Dog

Muddly Muddly,
Feed a cat,
Stuff it,
Inside a hat,
Tip it out onto,
A mat,
Muddly Muddly,
Feed at Cat

by Hannah age 10 Year 6 Churton Park School

 

 

Free

for Robin Hyde (inspired by ‘The Last Ones’)

Galloping along wild prairie
Paddling through the cool waters of the lake
Resting under a weeping willow
Braving the fierce winds of the desert
Soaring through grasses
Mane and tail billowing
To be wild
To be free

 

Name: Nell  Age: 9 Year: 4   Homeschool

November challenge #2: Some favourite poems that bounce from art

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I was so inspired by the updated The New Zealand Art Activity Book by Helen Lloyd I got you to write poems that leapt from one of the artworks I posted.

You all loved Sara Hughes’s gorgeous ‘Millions of Colours’. I do too!

I am posting just a few  you sent in. It was just fun reading how you made the poems pop with colour.

I am sending Daniel a copy of the activity book (Thanks Te Papa Press) because I really like the idea of dream eggs hatching colours.

And I am sending Tom a copy of The Letterbox Cat because I loved the repeating pattern of words that made the poem spin like Dick Frizzell’s dancing chicken.

 

You still have a change to do my Treasury challenge (I am really keen for NZ poets to be picked!). Even if you have a copy still try the challenge. See here.

Some Poems that bounce from ART:

Inspired by Dick Frizzell’s painting,  ‘The Dancing Chicken’:

 

The Dancing Smile

I am the dancing chicken
The dancing chicken
The dancing chicken
Watch me swirl
Watch me spin
The smiling, dancing chicken
So I won’t forget your spin.

I am the dancing chicken
Watch me twirl
Watch me spin
I’m pleased to give a smile
So I won’t forget your spin.

Tom N, Year 4, age 9, Hoon Hay School

 

 

Inspired By Sara Hughes painting: Millions of Colours

 

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 Daniel, Year 4, age 9, Adventure School

 

Colour dots

Spot, spot, spot, it’s a dot.
Jumping on the page.
Yellow like the sun, blue like the sea,
Colours all around me!
Red as a rose
And likes to pose
On the page.

By Clementine, 9, year 4, Lyttelton Primary School

 

Dots

Colours jump around the page
spots and dots
lots and lots of colours to be made,
yellow like the sun,
pink is lots of fun,
violet is the queen
like a never ending scheme.

Seraphine, 9, Year 4, Lyttelton Primary School

 

Blurry colours

Colours everywhere make me look stand stare
Blurry like a blind man’s seeing
like a colourful human being
Red like a rose, blue like the sky
The colours that fly on morning sky

Nydia, 8, Year 4, Lyttelton Primary School

 

Millions of colours

The colours I see in my head
I even see them even in my bed.
When I’m asleep at night the colours stop the fright.

The moonshine makes this poem rhyme.
The colours flee but come back at May
to keep the bad monsters at bay.

This is my poem I hope you like
make sure the colour stops the fright.

By Sophie M, 8, Year 4, Lyttelton Primary School

 

Colours!
Colours colours
I can see colours
I can see colours on a piece of paper.

Colours colours
I can see colours
I can see colours on a book.

Then I took that book and added more colours!!!!!!!!

Chloe D, 8, Year 4, Lyttelton Primary School

 

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Kate, Age 10, Year 5, Fendalton School

Welcome Back Day: A Treasury of NZ Poems for Children is out again & I have a giveaway copy

 

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A Treasury of NZ Poems for Children, ed Paula Green, illustrations Jenny Cooper, this edition, Penguin Random House, 2017

To celebrate the return of this gorgeous book to our shops (yeah I can buy more copies again!!)  I have one to give away to a child.

The wee challenge: Write a short poem for your favourite NZ poet (except I’d rather you didn’t pick me!!) Under the title write who the poem is for.  (for Joy Cowley or Margaret Mahy or Peter Bland or James K Baxter or Elena de Roo or Bill Manhire or Jenny Bornholdt or Peter Millet or Gavin Bishop or Kyle Mewburn or Janet Frame or Elizabeth Smith or Hone Tuwhare or Fifi Colston or Peggy Dunstan or Emma Neale or Shirley Gawith or Courtney Sina Meredith or Rachel McAlpine or Richard Langston or Anna Jackson or Sam Hunt or Sue Wotton or Bill Nagelkirke or John Parker or Ruth Paul or Apirana Taylor      …..    and there are lots more poets in the book including children!

 

The poem might be about anything.

It might borrow a title from your favourite poet.

Or borrow a character or a subject and take your poem in a new direction.

It might play with words.

It might tell a story.

 

Send to me by  Friday 8th December.

Include your name, age year and name of school.

Include  Treasury in email subject line.

I will post favourites and pick one to send book to on Monday 11th December.

Poetry fireworks: Storylines Hui poems from children’s authors Gavin, Stephanie, Melinda, Heather and Kerin

 

I took a poetry workshop at the Storylines Hui in October with about 30 children’s authors. It was fast-speed fun! We spent 90 minutes playing with words.

I loved the hui – so many highlights but what a treat to do workshops with Kate De Goldi and Joy Cowley and catch up with all my friends in the children’s book world.

I got the writers to send in some poems, even though, for most of them, poetry is NOT what they usually do. I think they are  word-sparkingly good and I just love the energy that sparks from their sounds and images and surprise!

Just the thing to say out loud in the rain!

 

from Gavin Bishop (who has the most amazing new book (Aotearoa A New Zealand Story) which I will review soon):

 

Mishap

 

Tongue and groove dripped ginger beer

onto the bench-top, onto the floor.

Like a guinea pig to the door, I slid,

like a pig through the door – the dripping kitchen door.

 

 

Window View

 

The Alps zig-zag between the frame.

The foot-hills scramble across the glass.

Looking down now, with kahu eyes, the city jives beneath my gaze.

 

 

Sun Shower

The sunshine is awash with water.

A blue raincoat flaps in light.

Sparrows spray aside as my daughter splashes by,

on her hydroponic bike.

 

 

 

from Stephanie Mayne (who has excellent poems in A Treasury of NZ Poetry reissued this month):

 

In My Pocket.

A blade of grass, a rusty nail

Marbles blue as a peacock’s tail.

Pale white shells, and out of reach

Sand, from swimming at the beach.

Half bus ticket, scrunched up note

(Hard to read what the writer wrote!)

Leaf I liked, old cough lolly

One glass eye from my sister’s dolly.

Half a biscuit, apple core

Yellow crumbs and ants galore.

Soft grey feather, cicada case

Fidget spinner? No more space!

 

 

from Melinda Szymanik (who wrote the completely amazing A Winter’s Day in 1939 among other excellent things):

 

Water’s for Ducks

Sun’s out

Birds try

Bird bath

Clouds come

Rain drips

Slow fills

Bath, spills

Clouds go

Sun’s out

Drips dry

Birds try

Bird bath

 

In Your Pocket

In your pocket

Are five pink

Shrink-wrapped sausages

Wriggling worms

In close white

Knitted tight

On knuckled digits

Hand in glove

In your pocket

 

 

Here. In School

I went to work

A school visit, close to home

And because I am polite

Not rude

I put my phone on silent

At morning tea

Messages are always checked

And this time,

This time

The message was different

“Is your boy home sick?” they asked

Just checking

Because he’s not at school.

I’d seen him off that morning

Uniformed, lunch packed, back pack hoisted.

Heart sick.

I felt heart sick

My boy was not in school

As he should be

Not in school

The message was different

Had I heard it right?

At lunch

The message was different

They had not heard him

Right?

When he said “here”

In school.

 

 

from Heather Haylock whose first picture book is to be published by Penguin Random House next year (Granny McFlitter the Champion Knitter – the current Gavin Bishop Award book, illustrated by Lael Chisholm):

 

River Fog
Low and slow, the dampness creeping.
Hid beneath, the river weeping.
Dark and deep, moving, masking,
underneath, the dragon dancing.

 

Pocket
My pocket left home this morning,
empty.
Full of possibilities.

My pocket came home
bulging with shame.

Two detention slips.
Another teacher’s note.
Grades too far down the alphabet.

My pocket, my friend,
hid my shame.

Until washing day.

 

From Kerin Casey who is busy writing children’s stories:

 

Griffin’s Hug

 

Wiry warm arms

Wrap tight around my neck

Squeezing love in

Wringing forgiveness

Unconditional

All-encompassing

Snug as a bug in a rug

Griffin’s hug

 

Humid

 

This soggy day of bedraggled entanglements

Drips and slips

Through my melting fingers

Sticky and limp

Deflated

Defeated

 

In My Pocket

 

In my pocket is a small round stone

Sea green

Warm heart

Whipped smooth by sand on a cold surf beach

Foam flying

Waves smashing

Found, weighed, then tossed by a friendly hand

Moves on

Reconsiders

Returns and seeks it out, desperate

Sea green

Warm heart

Smooths a gnarled thumb across its surface

And thinks of me

 

 

 

 

 

September challenge: Some of my favourite IMAGINATIVE poems

Thanks so much for sharing your BOUNDING imaginations in the form of a poem.

Poems are HUNGRY for bounding imaginations.

I loved reading them all and it was hard to pick a few  (well this is quite a LOT!)

 

I have a book for Lily, Tom and Cale.

 

Elementor Leopards

Their eyes are like the stormiest nights,
like Poseidon and Zeus fighting, the water.
Their noses are redder than a foxes tail, fire.
The lips of this leopard are the darkest green ever seen, earth.
There is a swirl on their forehead whiter than cloud, sky.
It was wonderful.

Its rosettes are like all the elements in a ball.
Earth was in the middle then little stripes of fire, water and air
were curved around the sides.
It was beautiful.

Leopards of the elements.

Lily M age: 8 year: 4 Paekakariki School

 

A stone

A stone lay high on the mountain top

And it turned into a bright blue gem

And that gem turned into a carbon black flame

Which flickered bright as the distant stars

And that plane turned into a tiny beige leaf

And that leaf turned into a jaguar

And that jaguar ran down the mountain

And came to a sudden halt.

At the edge of a forest he stood there waiting

And turned into a piece of cobalt

And that miniature piece of cobalt

Was picked up by a drone

And that drone dropped it on a mountain

where it warped back into a stone.

 

By Cale Year 8, age 12 Rangeview Intermediate School

 

A Giol Called Scover
I saw a Giol on Sunday,
A Giol is a bird.
It looked at me as if to say,
Gee man, you’re absurd.

He looked kind of green
With pink spots all over
I said to him
“I think I’ll name you Scover.”

Scover climbed a tree
And then he climbed the sky
I said I thought it was impossible
And he said na- you try.

I climbed the sky but fell back
And yelled the bad word sciof
I came back down again black and bruised
And he said guiltily “Well I’d better be off.”

He never came back after that
I thought I’d changed his mind
But he came back on Thursday
But he was a whole lot less kind.

Sylvie King, age 10, Selwyn House School

 

Flight

The fluttering pack of birds fly away to open a magnificent wonder world of magic. I see a pack of whirling wolves and flying pigs. I walk forward to find a castle filled with colour. I then discover a dark room. I walk to the middle of the room then start flying. I crash through the window and into the world.

By Daniel F Age 9 Fendalton School

 

Wild Imagination
I woke one morning.
The moon was cooking me breakfast.
I went outside.
There was the sun playing Go Fish.
I raced to school.
Instead of my teacher, there was a seagull.
My school was just a school of sardines.
I raced back home.
The house next door was made of cats and yarn.
My room was floating on water.

Honor, age 10, Selwyn House School

Stories

My best friend and I used to make up stories,
Of dragons, princesses and knights,
Of beautiful maidens,
And ballerinas in shining lights.

We would be the main characters in each story,
Fighting dragons and slimy creatures,
Killing all the villains,
And all the evil teachers.

We would dance like elegant swans,
And sing like chirping birds,
We would leap like fierce cheetahs,
With emotion coming out from every single move or word.

My friend and I are older now,
Instead of books,
We have phones,
It keeps us busy every single day,
Keeping us prisoners in our homes.

There is no such thing as magic anymore,
No faraway lands to see,
That used to keep us up late at night,
Fidgeting in our beds with glee.

I guess everybody gets older someday,
And forgets about their childish ways,
Some people don’t see what’s happening,
When they waste away their days.

Zoe G 12 years old St Cuthberts College

 

 

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Kylie, age 12, Rangeview Intermediate

 

Burnt Toast

Burnt your toast?

Not such a bad thing

Look at what you have created

Or even better… imaginated

 

Carve a shape for a toast sculpture

Or use little pieces for a toast mosaic

 

With a pinch of out of the box thinking

You might find you’ve made a mask

Or a fly swat

Or a trail marker on the ground

 

Add a smear of peanut butter and it is a bird feeder

Or turn it into chippies for ducks

 

Look, you’ve made a new Frisbee!

Or grab a Ping-Pong ball and play toast tennis

 

Stack it up. Make a hole in the middle. Enjoy your candle holder.

Or perhaps it is a fire starter

 

You could even strap it to your feet and show the world your new shoes

 

Burnt toast

The end of the world

Or the start of something great

It’s all in the way you imaginate

Gemma, age 11, Adventure School

 

 

The Eeb Evih Needs

The Eeb Evih needs:
peanut butter ice cream
visiting its evih
travelling in swarms
from Cape Reinga
to Bluff

The Eeb Evih needs:
wings to carry it
to New Plymouth
to visit the Len Lye Gallery

The Eeb Evih needs:
legs to carry honey
to Te Papa
to show New Zealand
how clever they are

The Eeb Evih needs:
arms to repair the evih
after its journey.

Joshua P 12 yrs old Medbury School, Christchurch

 

LIGHT THOUGHTS

I store the light

So it’s bright at night

Though I do feel sad when I’m on all night

I flicker and flutter

And run out of power.

 

I am happy when you are under me

I am comforted and not lonely

I would like to change my glow

So there is a soft light flow

 

But please don’t leave me on all night

Otherwise I won’t be so bright.

Daniel, age 9, Adventure School

 

Candy Man

Meet Candy Man
His name is Dan.
His hair is chocolate ice,
his head is chocolate rice.
Mentos eyes,
candy cane nose.
His mouth is in
two jelly bean rows.
Chewing gum scarf,
makes me laugh.
Candy floss tummy,
that’s so yummy.
M&M spots,
lots of dots.
Boots of jelly
for his welly boots.

By Philipp Age 9 Samoan Unit Richmond Road School

 

Wild Pet

My wild pet is a lion and a bird.
Together I call him Liord.
He has a long beak
a tired tale
It’s feathers fling
It’s wings go up and down
when he’s in town.
His fur is bushy
just like my hair.
That’s Liord!

By Alani Age 9 Samoan Unit Richmond Road School

 

Mashups

Lamb and Genie, riding in a Lamborghini.
Bear and horse together is Borse.
Poster and book, a Pohook.
Water and fizzy is Wafizzy.
Apple and banana, a Panana.
Computer and iPad, Compad.
Black and blue, red an white
What do they have in common?
They are all colours.
What about Blaue?
and Rite?
Are they colours too?

By Videl Age 11 Samoan Unit Richmond Road School

 

Fruit Man

His feet are medium oranges
His legs are rotten bananas
His stomach is a humungous apple
His chest is a poisoned pear
His neck is a bumpy boysenberry
His head is a square strawberry
His mouth is a bearded banana
His nose is a little blackberry
His eyes are ice-cream blueberries
His ears are small pineapples
and his hair is black and yellow liquorice!

By Oliana Age 10 Samoan Unit Richmond Road School

 

 

The Imagination Road

The dim lights cover,
The Imagination road,
Where anything is possible.
Just take a stroll.
The candy floss may fall on your head,
The chocolate coated trees may be just divine,
But as long as you make it to the
Jelly pit,
And do 5 flips,
Until you feel bouncy,
And alive.
At the end of the day,
Animals will parole the streets,
And deliver you back,
To the Imagination station.

Evie Johnson age 11 Selwyn House School

 

 

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Tom, age 9, Hoon Hay School, Christchurch

 

The Golcher

The Golcher is a scary beast.
It lives in a cave under the street
and feeds
on chuckly bones and goblin meat,
and when it feeds
its scaly wings
flap with joy.
His body is the opposite…
as cuddly as a fluffy toy.

By Alexander M Age 9 LS7 Westmere School

 

The Land of Topsy Turvey

Sea in the sky
where dolphins fly
and little fish dive
and octopie jive.
Unicorns dance
and Pegasus prance.
Griffins from France
look on in askance.
At the land of Topsy Turvey
people come to ride a whale or
swim in the rainbow sea.
Kids come to eat
unhealthy, healthy things or
run around in an upside down tower
looking around at teacher’s dancing
and relievers prancing
at the land of Topsy Turvey.

By Sophie M-R Age 10 LS7 Westmere School

 

Labrasneel

Endless eyes
eating
endless flies.
The Labrasneel.
Is a snake
and an
eel.
Walking on the beach
with his ugly
webbed feet.
With his black labrador face
He’ll win every race…
Beneath the sharp teeth
Lies the toungue.
Number one!

By Mia M Age 10 LS7 Westmere School

 

Drip Drop

Drip Drop
Round the clock.
Tic toc
Tic toc
Tic.
Mr Dun made a bun
Out of pungy lungy lung.
He started to lick
Then ate it quick.
Tic toc
Tic toc
Tic.

By Taylor M Age 11 LS6 Westmere School

 

Sleep

Jiggle juggle what a struggle
Here and there a flying pear.
Listening out, can’t get out.
The moon is so bright, like the sunlight.
Can’t get to sleep without counting sheep.
Shimmering here, limmering there.
My eyes are rocks, theyr’e starting to stop.
Tic Toc that’s the clock.
Stars are so bright, like the moonlight.
The phone is buzzing all night long.
I roll over from side to side.
Pitter patter, the rain is starting.

By: Genevieve age 9, Neve age 10 and Charlie D age 10 LS6 Westmere School

 

 

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By Aastha Year 8, age 13 Rangeview intermediate school

 

Trapped

Standing in the cold damp darkness

I stare at the faint sunlight above

My slimy green legs stuck on the mossy green grass

I croak for Hungry

My long tongue slips out catching a fly that was hovering above

I’m tired

I sleep

And I never wake up again

Iris, Fendalton School

Annual 2 is just the ticket for the older reader (say 9 to 12)

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Annual 2, edited by Susan Paris and Kate De Goldi, Annual Ink,  2017

 

Annual 2 has the coolest cover ever – it features two legs with stripy blue socks poking out of an open book.

It makes you want to dive into the ELECTRIC mix of comics, poems, stories, games, and essays inside  (and other curious things!!).

 

I would have LOVED this when I was a girl  – I would have scooted off to a hiding place to read and read and read until I got to the very end. And the next day I would have dipped and delved and reread all my favourite things.

I especially LOVE the LOOK of the collection but LOOKS are only the start if you are a hungry reader.

And the LOOK of this BOOK pays off because it is a VERY GOOD read.

 

I LOVE the poems.

I really LOVE the poems.

 

Nick Ascroft has written a poem about wealth – and it turns into LIST poem that shows wealth is not all about counting money but what you do with your TIME ! Here’s a taste:

 

Wealth can be counted, but in time

not in dollars or things –

 

days since you ate a macadamia nut,

hours since you last rode a bike

 

Lynley Edmeades has written ‘Island’, a poem about camping that is so vivid you think you are in the tent. Here is a sample:

 

It’s always yellow inside

and the nylon is an island

for the to and from the grass.

 

Kate Camp has written ‘Emergency Haiku,’ the best haiku ever that made me laugh out loud. Here is a sweet morsel:

 

In emergency

break glass. Unless the problem

is a smashed window.

 

James Brown has written ‘Cheat Sheet for My Enemies’, an acrostic poem, that is rather keen on fudging the truth. It is very tricky as the right-hand side shows the acrostic title going from bottom to top, while the left-hand side shows it going from top to bottom! Here is a little bite:

A prime number is the first one on a number line.

The Titanic was a famous lifeboat.

 

I highly recommend Annual 2 for readers that love to be challenged or delighted or amused.

Even though I am no longer twelve I scooted off to my secret reading hidey-hole and read the collection from cover to cover. WONDERFUL!

Welcome back to Poetry Box 2017 – a little letter and a little challenge

 

 

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a blue sky at our place!

 

 

Dear young poetry fans,

I do hope you have all had a lovely summer even if the sun didn’t shine as much as it usually does, the wind was windier and the rain was rainier.

I have been hard at work writing my big book but after I did a stunt-woman routine in my bedroom (BY ACCIDENT!) and flew through the air like a frisbee and crash landed on the wooden frame of the bed – I injured my back! So I have not been able to sit at the computer and do all the things I usually do. Now I can have small bursts.

 

So I am going to start the year off with a small-poem challenge for you.

 

Little poems are like chocolates – they can taste sweet or sour but they do TASTE!

You can play with how many words you use on each line because that will change the SOUND and the LOOK of the poem.

You can HIDE a very tiny thing in the poem: a glorious word, a single rhyme,  an idea, an object.

 

The challenge: Try writing a bunch of small poems. Say no more than 16 words or no more than 10 words or no more than 20 words. YOU CHOOSE!

Give the poem a title. Those words don’t count in the total.

Try leaving the poem for a week before you send it to me and give it a sound check before you do. As a poet I always do this. I wrote a poetry ms last summer and I have left it for a whole YEAR!

 

Deadline: March 28th.

Email: write small poem in subject line

Send to: paulajoygreen@gmail.com

Include: your name, age, year and name of school. You can include your teacher’s email if you like.

I will post some favourites on APRIL 1st

and have a least one book to give away just because.

 

BTW I have finished my collection of children’s poems using the titles you all gave me! I loved doing it so much!

 

Warm regards,

Paula

 

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Molly wants to go for a walk! No swimming lessons for her this summer in the wild west-coast surf.