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Poetry Box October tree poem challenge

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Tāne Mahuta, the giant kauri tree in the Waipoua Forest, Northland

 

I love reading poems with trees in them. I love looking at the trees out side and we have a lot because we live in a big clearing in the bush in the country. We can see the tail end of the Waitākere Ranges from our place. We don’t go into the ranges now because we want to give the kauri the best possible chance to survive.

I have set a tree poem challenge for October – and you still have time! So here is a refresh for you after the holidays!

I don’t read the poems and your letters until the end of the month and then I always reply!

 

Some tips

It might be a New Zealand native tree you especially love.

You might go out and take a photo or do a drawing that you send with your poem.

Your poem might bring the tree to life with strong detail

or it might tell a tree story

or a tree memory you have

or a concern you have.

Use your eyes to hunt for fascinating things.

Use your imagination to hunt for fresh similes.

You might like to play with how you set your poem out.

 

Send to: paulajoygreen@google.com

Deadline: Friday October 28th

Please include: your name, age, year and name of school

So I don’t miss it: Put tree poem in subject line

A poem for Bird of the Year: The Kereru

 

 

The Kereru

 

A soupy mix

of sea blue and river green,

with his plump white pillow chest

the wood pigeon flies

flap shlip flap shlap

from one tree to the next

in his hunt for berries

bright red best,

flap shlip flap shlap.

 

©Paula Green

from The Letterbox Cat published by Scholastic

 

 

 

Children – if you have a kereru drawing I could post with this

and you have parental permission

send it to me paulagreen@gmail.com

 

Some favourite poems inspired by Inside the Villains book

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I so loved Inside the Villains by Clotilde Perrin (Gecko Press, 2018) I created a holiday popUP poem challenge for you.  Gemma and Daniel had friends over so spent a couple of hours coming up with villain poems and ‘rolling round on the floor in hysterics’.

I loved reading these and laughed out loud! These poems step off from fairy-tale villains and have fun. I loved the wit and playfulness.

I am sending a copy of the book to Gemma and Daniel.

You might like to try my October poetry tree challenge

 

 

The Stepmonster

So many years

Wasted in front of a mirror

Never seeing what was really there

 

Her heart is black

A rotten apple

Decay runs through her veins

 

If rose tinted glasses

Had covered her green eyes

She might have had her own happy ending

 

Gemma, Age 12 Year 8 Adventure School

 

 

The One Big Wolf

There once was a wolf with a cold

Who came to a house made of mould

The smell made him sneeze

And a big sudden breeze

Made the house fall down ‘coz it was old

 

Daniel Age 10 Year 5 Adventure School

 

Troll

Troll under the bridge

Wants food but there is no fridge

What about a goat?

 

Layla Age 12 Year 8 Tawa Intermediate

 

Fairy Tales

I don’t like fairy tales

They don’t have fairies or tails

The villages seem lacking in jails

And the villains are usually males

 

Ryan Age 12 Adventure School

 

The Farmer’s Wife

A shining knife

A final polish

A lift to the block

A glimpse

A fright

The knife takes flight

Reflecting sun

Blinds 3-2-1

Mice stop

And the knife?

 

CHOP!

 

By Gemma and Daniel

 

Poor Wolfy

There once was a wolf in the wood

Who found Little Red Riding Hood

He wanted a friend

But alas, in the end

She thought he was up to no good.

 

By the Fab 5

 

The Big Bad Wolf

Three little pigs

Build on my land

I tell them to stop

I’ve got something planned

 

They look at me funny

And say “how ‘bout no?”

They offer me money

I say, “please, just go.”

 

But they build on and so

It makes me get mad

‘Til I huff and I blow

And…

 

Well, the rest is history isn’t it

(and I am sad).

Gemma, Age 12 Year 8 Adventure School

 

Rainbow Six Witch

There once was a witch

Who played Rainbow Six

She mained twitch

And liked to rage quit

On defence she’s a roamer

And shoots mainly droners

Once she mained Ash…

But it made her computer crash.

 

James Age 13 Year 8 Adventure School

 

Grovewood Border Patrol report (by Officer Troll)

The Billy Goats Gruff

Known for smuggling stuff

Are attempting to get to the other ridge

I am patrolling the entrance bridge

And if they get through despite it all

I’ll be the one to take the fall

 

Zane Age 13 Year 8 Adventure School

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A poem from Peter Bland’s fabulous new collection for children

 

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Peter Bland is one of my favourite local poets who writes for children. He has new book

The Happy Garden: New & Selected Poems for Children

Steele Roberts 2018

which I think should be in every school library and on every children’s bookshelf.

Peter writes with exactly the right ingredients: a trampoline imagination, a whizzing ear for rhyme, eye for things that surprise, sparkling humour. Peter’s poems are like little chemical reactions where things fizz and change and react and connect. Or little surprise parcels for us to open.

The Happy Garden does all these things and more! Peter has kindly given me permission to post a poem on my blog. Steele Roberts page.

 

 

The tiny tiny spider

A tiny tiny spider

is crossing the bathroom floor.

I leave him tiny tiny crumbs

he chooses to ignore.

The bathroom floor’s a desert.

I think the spider’s lost.

I think he thinks he’s a camel

and a desert has to be crossed.

Keep going, tiny spider

until you find a cave

in a crack in the tiles

or a hole in the wall

that’s cosy, warm and safe.

 

©Peter Bland

 

 

 

 

You might  like to check out my popUP

holiday poem challenge (deadline from Friday!!)

and my October poetry tree challenge

 

Excellent holiday reading: Stories of the Night by Kitty Crowther

You might also like to check out my popUP

holiday poem challenge and my October

poetry tree challenge

 

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Stories of the Night by Kitty Crowther (Gecko Press, 2018) age 5+

 

Kitty lives in Belgium – her parents are English and Swedish. She has written and illustrated over 40 books. They have been translated into 20 languages and won many awards. In 2010 she won a major prize for children’s authors: The Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award.

Kitty dedicated the book to Sarah who came to stay one night and dreamed Kitty wrote a book called ‘Stories of the Night‘ with a pink cover and a handwritten title! Wonderful!

And now it is in the world!!

 

Kitty’s new book is an absolute honey of a book – a modern fairy tale – that I want to read and read and read again.

Little Bear wants Mother Bear to tell three bedtime stories to help them go to sleep.

The book is exquisite pink the perfect pink for a book that is dreamy and magical and soothes. A smallish hardback that I have held in my hand for two days before opening because I wanted to save and savour it!!!

The beautiful drawings take me back to all the bear books I have loved – so full of life and delight.

 

The number 3 is powerful in fairy stories – 3 stories are Little Bear’s way into sleep.

The first story is about the Night Guardian who says when it is time to go to sleep even when it doesn’t feel like time because there is one more thing to do!

 

Donnnnng Donnnnnnnng

“It’s time to go to bed, little ant.”

“I just need to get this one piece of petal,” called a tiny voice.

 

The second story is about a little girl with a sword who gets lost. She goes hunting for blackberries and ends up having the snuggliest sleep.

 

Zhora snuggled under a leaf and fell fast asleep. She felt safe.

At dawn, she heard her brothers and sisters calling her in the distance. She was so excited to tell them about her adventures, but her bed was snuggle and warm so she stayed just a little longer. Right now, being here was perfect.

 

The third story is about the man in a big coat who never sleeps. I especially love this story because his best friend Otto the otter writes poems on stones and throws them into the sea.

 

Bo was delighted to be back in his bed.

The moment his head touched the pillow, he sank into a deep sleep. He didn’t ask if this was because of his night swim or because he’d found one of Otto’s stone poems or because he had such a wonderful friend—or even if it was a mixture of everything.

 

Good books make us feel good but they also shine little lights on the world – on how we fit together in families and friendships. I love this book because it reminded me of my life as a mother, a daughter and a friend, of how stories are gold, and kindness and gentleness and braveness and perseverance are also gold. Sleep well young readers!

this book is a keep-me-forever dreamtime book

 

 

 

 

 

The 2018 Storylines Betty Gilderdale Award for outstanding service to children’s literature: Jeannie Skinner

My popUp holiday poetry VILLAIN challenge here

My October poetry TREE challenge here

 

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I have had the pleasure of working with Jeannie on a number of occasions In Northland and offer my warmest congratulations for this well deserved honour. Wonderful!!

 

The 2018 Storylines Betty Gilderdale Award for outstanding service to children’s literature has been awarded to Northland’s passionate advocate for children’s books and literacy, Jeannie Skinner.

Both in her role as Capability Facilitator for National Library’s Service to Schools and as a volunteer for the Storylines Children’s Literature Trust and other children’s books-related organisations, Jeannie has been a leading light in promoting books and reading over three decades through Northland’s public libraries and schools.

She has helped organise and promote Storylines and New Zealand Book Council author tours, developed an award for student librarians, as well as running short story awards, quizzes for young people and popular blog post.

As an acknowledged expert in children’s books and related professional literature, she was appointed convenor of the judging panel for the 2018 New Zealand Children’s Book Awards.

Jeannie will be presented with her award at a function in Auckland late in November. Details to be advised in the November Storylines e-newsletter.

The Storylines Betty Gilderdale Award has been given annually since 1990 to acknowledge the ‘unsung heroes’ of New Zealand children’s literature, who have undertaken outstanding work at either a local or national level. It was named in honour of noted Auckland academic and children’s author Betty Gilderdale.

More details here

Poetry Box October challenge: tree poems

you might also like to check out my popUP holiday poetry challenge

 

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My daughter drove up north to see Tāne Mahuta, the giant kauri tree in the Waipoua Forest. I saw it a number of times when I was little and it seemed so ancient and so precious. Now our kauri trees are under threat. I live next to the Waitakere Ranges wher large parts of the bush have been closed off. I live on land that is regenerating bush, slowly and wonderfully. I feel like I can touch the ranges from my deck.

October is the month where Poetry Box will celebrate New Zealand/ Aotearoa native trees by writing poems. I am excited about this because I love trees.

 

Some tips

It might be a New Zealand native tree you especially love.

You might go out and take a photo or do a drawing that you send with your poem.

Your poem might bring the tree to life with strong detail

or it might tell a tree story

or a tree memory you have

or a concern you have.

Use your eyes to hunt for fascinating things.

Use your imagination to hunt for fresh similes.

You might like to play with how you set your poem out.

 

Send to: paulajoygreen@google.com

Deadline: Friday October 28th

Please include: your name, age, year and name of school

So I don’t miss it: Put tree memory in subject line

 

I will post favourites around about October 31st and while this is not a competition I will have a book for at least one writer.

 

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Looking towards the Waitākere Ranges down

through our bush. And our tamarillo tree.