Tag Archives: poems for children

October Poetry Box Challenge – Imagination leaps

 

 

I love letting my imagination set sail when I write poems (amidst a thousand other things).

So for October, I challenge you to write a poem with a dollop of imagination.

I suggest letting your poem sit for a few days before you send it to me so you can spot things you might like to improve – or mistakes.

 

Here are some tips and starting points:

Ask some what if questions. What if I could fly? What if the world were made of broccoli?

Imagine you are a character from a book.

See things in the real world completely differently. A world of tall things. A topsy-turvy world.

Invent some animals as I did in my poem ‘Anifables.’

Write an ordinary poem about ordinary things but then give it an extraordinary ending.

Imagine something strange happens in your back garden.

Imagine you have a secret.

Invent a new food or tree or machine.

Imagine you meet a famous person.

 

….. or surprise me … with your own imagination             l   e   a   p

 

Hunt for really good detail before you start writing your poem.

Listen to every line.

Test out three very different endings.

Remember to give it a title.

 

How will you set your poem out?

Hide a surprise in your poem somewhere.

 

Imagine something that happened in history very differently.  Like landing on the moon.

 

h a v e     f u n    !

 

SEND your poem to paulajoygreen@gmail.com

DEADLINE Friday October 28th

Include your name, age, year and name of school. You can include your teacher’s email if you like.

P l e a s e    p u t   ‘Imagination poem’ in the subject line of your email.

I will pick some favourites to post on the blog and have a book for at least one reader and maybe even a book for a class.

I will post on  Monday 31st October.

 

 

 

August Challenge on Poetry Box – telling little poem stories

Poems that tell little stories can be really fun to read. Your challenge this month is to write a story poem. It can be really short or medium.

Here are some tips for you:

 

Use something that happened to you or someone you know as a starting point.

You don’t have to tell the whole story! Tell the bits that interest or fascinate you.

You can keep it real or add a dollop of imagination. Or do more than one version.

 

Retell a story from a book you have read

You might keep bits the same and you might add your own twists but you will have to miss things out – it is a poem after all.

 

Retell a myth or legend

Which bits matter and need to be in your poem? You might write from the point of view of one of the characters.

 

Take a book title as a starting point for your poem and then write your own story poem.

 

Take a newspaper headline as a starting point and then write your own story poem.

 

Take a favourite character from a story you like and invent a little poem story for them.

What changes about them?

 

What changes in your story poem?

Is there a surprise? There doesn’t have to be!

 

Try different beginnings and endings.

 

h a v e     f u  n     ! * ! *!

 

SEND your poem to paulajoygreen@gmail.com

DEADLINE Saturday August 27th

Include your name, age, year and name of school. You can include your teacher’s email if you like.

P l e a s e    p u t   ‘Story poem’ in the subject line of your email.

I will pick some favourites to post on the blog and have a book for at least one reader and maybe even a book for a class.

I will post on Wednesday August 31st.

Poetry Box June challenge – I love poems with things in them

 

 

Now that winter is here, and the fire is roaring, the soup simmering and the wind whipping about our house like a mad dog, it is time to snuggle into good books and a spot of poetry writing!

This month I challenge you to write a poem about a thing.

It might be something you love or something someone in your family loves.

It might be comfortable, strange, old, new, surprising. Maybe you don’t like it that much at all!

It might move. It might stay still. But it is not alive. It is an object.

 

I love poems with things in them.

 

You might use the thing to tell a teeny tiny story.

You might hide how you feel about the thing in your poem.

You might use words to take a photo of your thing.

You might not ever say what the thing is.

 

You might use the thing to write a poem about a person (tricky!). Maybe it is something favourite of your mum or dad!

 

You need to think carefully about how you start and end your poem. Have a few tries and then pick your favourites.

HOT TIP: Try hunting for lots of good words before you start writing!

 

ANOTHER HOT TIP: Listen to the sound of every line so your ears can tell if your poem flows well.

 

SEND your poem to paulajoygreen@gmail.com

DEADLINE Tuesday June 28th

Include your name, age, year and name of school. You can include your teacher’s email if you like.

P l e a s e    p u t   ‘Thing poem’ in the subject line of your email.

I will pick some favourites to post on the blog and have a book for at least one reader and maybe even a book for a class.

I will post on Thursday June 30th.

 

my periscope cloud and another winter challenge

Children often ask me where I get my ideas from.  I usually say the world. Ideas just come to me like little flocks of birds. Little starting points jump out at me.

This poem I wrote fits our Winter theme this week. It was the most amazing sight! Maybe you can have a go at a cloud poem for the Winter challenge. Where to send it is below!

 

Today at the beach

I saw a skinny cloud

sticking its long skinny head

up like a periscope, as though

it wanted to see over the Tasman Sea

to Australia, and see what all

the other clouds were doing

and to see (most especially)

if any other cloud

knew how to look like

a long skinny periscope!

 

 

DEADLINE for your Winter-Poem Challenge: Thursday June 12th

Send to paulajoygreen@gmail.com. Include your name, year, age and name of school. You can include your teacher’s name and email. PLEASE say it’s for the Winter-Poem challenge.

I will post my favourites  and have a book prize for one poet (Year 0 to Year 8).

similes are EYE catching … give it a go

Similes are way to give your poem extra zing.

Similes can be EYE catching.

I always hunt for a few when I need one … then I test them out and choose my favourite.

Sometimes a poem gets an extra spark with just one EXTRA good simile.

Sometimes you can use a truck load of similes.

 

H e r e    i s     a    c h a  l  l e n g e:

Pick an animal.

Write down all the important parts of the animal (colour, kind of skin, ears, pattern, trunk, special things like tusks and so on).

Find similes for some of them.

Write a short poem about that animal using just one EXTRA good simile.

Write another poem using as many similes as you like but only use your favourite ones.

LISTEN to your poem.

Get a friend or someone in your family to tell you which simile catches their EYE!

 

You can enter this in the Eye-Poem Challenge.

DEADLINE for your Eye-Poem Challenge: Thursday March 27th

Send to paulajoygreen@gmail.com. Include your name, year, age and name of school. You can include your teacher’s name and email. PLEASE say it’s for the eye-poem challenge.

I will post my favourites and have a book prize for one poet.

Using my eyes on an aeroplane

IMG_4345 IMG_4348 IMG_4352

Usually I write a poem with my head in the clouds and my feet on the ground.

Last week I flew to Wellington and wondered what it would be like to write a poem with my head on the ground and my feet in the clouds.

I used my eyes to hunt for a poem through the aeroplane window.

What strange place can you go hunting for a poem? And use your eyes to spot things?

 

F l y i n g

I am flying through a blue

that falls all the way to the ground,

but my feet are in the clouds.

I can see Mt Taranaki

with no winter clothes,

and white caps of foam

waving on the sea.

I wave back.

 

Have a go at writing a poem from somewhere different. Use your eyes to help you.

You can enter your poem in the Eye-Poem Challenge.

DEADLINE for your Eye-Poem Challenge: Thursday March 27th

Send to paulajoygreen@gmail.com. Include your name, year, age and name of school. You can include your teacher’s name and email. PLEASE say it’s for the eye-poem challenge.

I will post my favourites and have a book prize for one poet.