Tag Archives: Russley School

Autumn Poems on Poetry Box – a festival

So many wonderful Autumn poems arrived in my mail box – it was like a big mound of beautiful leaves to shuffle through.

With so many poems it was extra hard to pick a few to post – lots of wonderful poetry so I have made an Autumn festival of poems on the last day of Autumn. Poems can do so many different things!

 

Thank you so much for giving this challenge a go – just as winter is about to hit us.

I am sending Finn a book.

Please don’t feel sad if I didn’t pick your poem as I got so many it took all Sunday to read them and I have to leave out so many amazing poems. I will have told you what I loved about your poem in my letter to you. I am so happy there is so much poetry buzzing in schools and families.

 

Do try my new June challenge on Wednesday June 1st (tomorrow)!

 

A Small Boat

Sailing on the
deliciously warm
autumn days
when sunlight
dapples the sea

Finn P age 9, Ilam School

 

 

 

Leaves

The gentle leaves fall and flow

down from the trees.

They change to lovely colours,

like kakariki,

to kowhai,

to whero.

They float down to the grass.

I wish I could be a leaf.

Erena H Age 6 Year 2 Epsom Normal Primary

 

The Autumn Wind

the autumn wind is a crunchy cookie

the autumn wind is a soft pillow

the autumn wind is a bird singing

the autumn wind is a beautiful mountain

 

Maddy W  7 years old Year 3 Pāpāroa Street School Christchurch

 

 

The Autumn Wind

 

the autumn wind is my great grandad’s wrinkly face

the autumn wind is a bird playing F-sharp minor being played on the piano

the autumn wind is a tornado blowing leaves down form the sky

the autumn wind is a swaying, turning whirlpool

the autumn wind is a cyclone lost from a breeze of wind

 

Jack S 8  years old Year 4 Pāpāroa Street School Christchurch

 

Windy Autumn

Crackle, crackle went the dry leaves as they bounced on the ground like they were on a trampoline.
I heard leaves making music as they crashed, crunched and clashed on to the ground like an enormous tom tom drum being beaten.
It made a sound like thunder.
I could see a crimson leaf swirling and twirling – twirling – twirling in the bright sunny morn. Leaves are memories floating down to be free.
I splash in pools of everlasting leaves.
Autumn, she blows the leaves.

Charlotte H 9 years 5 months, Year 5 Kohia Terrace School, Auckland.

 

 

Autumn

It is a dull autumn morning.

The sun is peeping out from the clouds.

Insects are hiding in the golden leaves.

The colourful leaves look like a carpet on the damp ground.

 

 Zihao L Year 4 Age 8 Epsom Normal Primary

 

Autumn Treasure

The amber colours,
flutter down like soft balloons,
my cat follows the hibernating hedgehogs,
I get ready for the cold,
the blanket of sunset colours falls over me.

Ruby T Age 8, Y4, Ilam School

 

 

The Caretaker

As the children leave school

he sneaks out of his shed

with a rake and lawnmower.

He ruffles the bushes

and attacks the grass.

He rescues the leaves

and walks home.

His day is done.

Malo G 8 years old Fendalton Open Air School

 

Autumn Poem
Soft breeze pushing amber
Down to the lime green grass.
Popping candy pops
When I scrunch up
Scarlet red.
Twirling ballerinas
Falling to the ground.
Soft breeze
Pushing me away
From the beautiful leaves.
Oh, I love Autumn.

Abbie M, 8 years,  Year 4 Ilam School, Christchurch

 

 

Autumn

The brown leaves

smell like sweet cinnamon

and are as crunchy

as a twig.

Light red leaves

slowly fall.

The ground is as bumpy

as a potato chip.

Trees are wet and bare.

William S  8 years Year: 4  St Andrews College, Christchurch

 

Falling Autumn Leaves

When I stepped out down came an autumn leaf

and landed swift and sound

with all the others,

all the autumn leaves in their many colours,

I watched in wonder.

By Lachie M 8yr Year 4 Mairangi Bay School, Auckland

 

Fire Red, Deep Brown, Pale Yellow

The Autumn leaves whirl around
like a hurricane in the chilly weather.
They have colours like fire red,
deep brown and pale yellow.
The trees, bare to the brim
are covered in sharp twigs.
It is as cold as ice.
My fingers are becoming numb
and my lips are turning blue.

Meg S, 9 years old, Year 5, Saint Andrew’s College, Christchurch.

 

Moonlight Autumn

In the sun of the Moonlight

I lay on the grass

with seven fireflies around me

I stand up and let the wind go by

I stand and say goodbye to Summer

and hello to Autumn after midnight

Seven minutes pass and I’m still

not tired.

 
Max Wilson Aged 6 Ilam School

 

 

Autumn

Leaves fluttered down.

Trees blow in the wind.

They look like a skeleton.

Crunching like a ball of fire.

Maddie  Age 8  Year 4 Pāpāroa Street School Christchurch

 

Autumn

Old ugly branches hung

like bats in their cave.

Bald tree

with curved witches nails.

The wind blew

like a tornado.

Leaves like red flames.

A nosy fantail followed me

for food.

 By Soverin T Y5 age 9 Russley School Christchurch

 

 

Autumn Wind

The autumn wind is a blowing circus.

The wind is like a tsunami.

The autumn wind is a rumbling tummy.

 

Nicholas T Age 7 Year 3 Pāpāroa Street School Christchurch

 

Fall

It’s getting darker now

My friends and I discuss in hushed voices

About how were getting ready to fall

When mother tree tucks us in

I dream about a world on the ground

By Daisy-Jane Lowe, age 11yrs Russley School

 

 

Autumn

An innocent pile of leaves,

Drying in the morning sun.

The red-brown colours,

Fluttering in the crisp air.

The pile shifts,

Ever so slightly.

Then,

Rah!

Out jumps my brother.

With damp leaves in his hair.

Isis W 13 years old Year 8 Selwyn House School

 

Autumn

Thin old leaves

hang like a wrecking ball

on the end of a chain.

 

A curved purple leaf

quivers

on a thick brown branch.

 

A bald Silver Birch

stands like the Statue of Liberty

a leaf stem

as long as a baby snake.

 

Saffron leaves

like a bowl of nachos.

 

A game of rugby on a freezing icy day,

getting thrown on the ground

walking home with dirty legs.

 

By Gustavo D, age 10yrs, Russley School

 

I Love Autumn

I love the nice and cool autumn breeze

The way it raps its cold fingers around my knees.

I love watching the leaves get blown around

Down, down towards the ground.

I love the sound of the whispering trees

Moving back and forth as they please.

I love the taste of boiling hot stew

Waiting for winter to come to you.

I love the smell of sweet apple crumble

As soon as I see it, my tummy starts to rumble.

I love the feel, taste, sound, smell and sight.

I love autumn, but try as I might

I can’t find a way

To love winter in this way.

By Paige M West End School

 

 

 

Autumn

The sun peeked behind the dead trees.

Wind raced around the place.

Leaves float gently down to the ground.

Ella X Year 4 8 years old Epsom Normal Primary

 

The Autumn Poem

Leaves, crackling, gold,

like a crunchy bar. Branches,

brown, thin, like an old man’s arms.

Leaves, quivering, hanging off.

Me and my friends play

rugby union at school, I hear people

yelling from the side line, I have

dirt on my legs and I’m laughing

and I have butterflies in

my stomach.

by Makenzy M, age 10 Russley School

 

My Little Autumn Tree

My little Autumn tree,
Stands strong and tall beside me.
Flaky branches reaching high,
Fingertips just scraping the sky.
The early morning frost makes you shiver,
But the warm fiery sun makes you shimmer.
Your crisp golden leaves twinkle and twirl,
And in the wind the whirl.
But my little Autumn tree,
What happens when your leaves begin to flee?
For they leave you all alone,
Cold and bare to the bone.
You watch them fly away,
Day after day.
Scattered beneath you,
Slowly drifting far away.
But don’t worry my little Autumn tree,
You’ll always have me.

Amy B Opaki School Age 12

 

Autumn poem

Leaves fall

slowly to the cold ground.

 

Red, orange, yellow everywhere,

not a drop of green in site.

 

Running through the colourful

crunching leaves, jumping

in wet leaf mountains.

 

Sleeping in warm toasty bed,

when the fire is out.

 

Waking up to a cold damp morning, ready for a new day.

 

Jenna L Age: 12 School: Opaki School

 

Leaves

brown, old and ugly

like a witch’s nose

crunchy like stale bread.

 

Branches,

bumpy like a climbing wall

swerve like big waves.

 

Leaves, red like a mad man

orange like juice

yellow like hard cheese.

By Bridget Egan, age 10yrs Russley School

Some of my favourite poems from The Fourth Fabulous Poetry Competition and a hidden challenge for you

 

c   o   n   g    r   a   t   u   l   a   t   i   o   n   s  !

So many fabulous poems came in for this i want to post a small collection of some of my favourites. It was hard to choose as I had so many.

What I love is the way a poem can surprise you. You know you want to go back and read it again. You know eyes and ears have been hard at work.

Congratulations young poets. You have done a fine job. I do hope you try some of my Monday challenges in term time.

A challenge for you all: If I get 30 comments on this post, I will pick one child to send a copy of A Treasury of NZ Poetry for Children. Tell me which poem you love and why. Extra points if you pick one that is not from your school!  Tell me your age, year and name of school and teacher’s email. I have an copy of Dear Heart: 150 NZ Love Poems for an adult who comments on a poem.

 

Panther

I am a cunning panther

Black as pitch black night

 

I leap quite majestically

I silently stalk my prey

 

I spring up to scale large trees

I growl like a deadly beast

 

As I am a cunning black panther

Black as pitch black night

Quin aged 10, Year 6, Hauraki School

 

Bright Green

Prickly, wet grass

yummy, juicy grapes

wobbly, slimy seaweed

bumpy, hard broccoli

Lincoln, Y2, Age 6, Barton Rural School

 

Demon

Big scary creature of the night

eagle like wings and fur not light

big scary creature of the night

claws like razors teeth like knives.

Big scary creature of the night

howling out my name

big scary creature of the night

please tell me you are tame.

Lucas, Y5, Age 9, Good Shepherd School

 

Sun

The shimmering sun.

The quailing wind smashes me.

The sand is so soft.

Logan, Y5, Age 8, Good Shepherd School

 

Night is a Fright

All the shadows on the wall make me fall, fall, fall

All the spooky sounds make me scramble

slip and fall

I try to think about my love of ponies

Bur it doesn’t help

I listen to my Mum and dad drink Sprite

oh how fizzy “oooo” what’s that sound? “ahhh”

I think only think night gives me a fright!

Jemima, Y2, Age 6, Good Shepherd School

 

The Night Sky

the stars glisten like Lake Tekapo

with the sun on it

the stars are shiny like black ice

white, like paper from the Bible

 

stars shoot through the sky

like rockets

Alex, Y6, age 10, Russley School

 

My Grandad

My grandad is as tall as a giraffe

My grandad is as friendly as a monkey

He wears blue glasses

like me

He used to sew up shirts in the air force

Now he carefully sews up my teddy bears

Josh, Y4, age 8, Russley School

 

Nana

She is as happy as a beautiful bright fish

 

She looks interested when she is watching

Chinese news

 

She helps me when I am scared

of the dark

 

She is a Chinese teacher

and artist

 

She draws flowers

fish

mermaids

turtles

and fire-breathing dragons

Sophia Y4, age 8, Russley School

 

Black Beard Dad

One time my dad caught a leaf

instead of a fish

 

He runs

a bit like Usain Bolt

 

He is a geologist

he blows up rocks

 

He wears a soft checked shirt

 

and has fillings between his teeth

like silver stars

Fergus Y3, age 7, Russley School

 

Rain

Plink, plonk, plink there is the rain

Plink, plonk, plink there it is again

Rain splashes on the roof of my house

like little girls doing tap

pitter, patter, pitter, patter

like a possum scampering

across our roof.

Meg Y3, Age 7, Carncot School

 

The Raging Bull

The ocean is an angry bull

Charging to the water’s edge

Pounding the seabed with its powerful horns

As the day goes on, he roars and roars

Carrying away sticks and stones

 

Licking his greasy hooves

The storm passes through

He sits with his head hung low

Calm and still

Waiting for the wind to blow and for the sky to turn grey

Sophie, Y6, Age 11, Carncot School

 

Monsters

There is a giant monster in my house

Searching and perching on my couch

Munching and crunching on my favourite snacks

He hears the floor crack and is tempted to look  back

I run upstairs, knock my head

Only to find another monster in my bed

Antoinette, Y6, age 11, Carncot School

 

Winter Is Here

Icing sugar is falling from a crying cloud.

White messages are falling from the sky.

White owls in the sky are dropping their feathers.

Angels are losing teeth and are dropping them.

Little girls have frozen wands,

they are making it snow.

Sabina Y3, Age 7 Arrowtown School

 

Mapua Estuary

Where the shy hermit crabs scutter away from prying hands,

Where the nimble swallows flutter while chirping their careless songs.

Where the old boats gently bob like nodding heads,

Where the flapping flags cast a jittering shadow.

Where moorings fight an endless struggle against the tide,

Where live music drifts around crimson pohutukawa.

Where an army of pines sway in chorus with the rolling breeze,

Where seagulls clutter the skies scaring away the gently peace.

Where mud flats offer a feast to the restless oyster catchers,

Where driftwood quietly slips away, away to another faraway land.

Hamish, Y8, age 12, Arrowtown School

 

Winter River

Pebbles line the riverbed,

The bare willows lie above,

Riverweed starts to freeze,

Dead leaves rustle in the wind.

 

The bare willows lie above,

Sparrows fly overhead,

Dead leaves rustle in the wind,

With the crisp smell of the air.

 

Sparrows fly overhead,

Riverweed starts to freeze,

With the crisp smell of the air,

Pebbles line the riverbed.

Sarah Y8, age 12, Arrowtown school

 

Chocolate, a musical sensation

I tear open the purple wrapper

with a satisfying rip!

The taste is soothing and mellow

like smooth jazz,

an orchestra of flavours on my tongue.

It fills me with addictive adrenaline,

once I start I cannot stop,

a drum solo in my mouth.

My taste buds explode

all the flavours in harmony,

I give in and admit defeat.

Chocolate is …

the ultimate beat.

Paddy-Kees Y8, age 12, Arrowtown School

 

Rain Guardian

If I could control the rain

I would be called the Rain Guardian

I would go to places like Egypt, Africa and Iran

And water the crops making them come to life

I would donate water for dying children and people

I can help the Earth become a better place

I can heal the hearts and souls of people in the world

BECAUSE I AM THE RAIN GUARDIAN

Anna Y6 Age 10, Fairburn School, South Auckland

 

Lonely Fox

Rain falling

leaves tumbling

fox squeaks

bush rumbling

water leaks

bees buzzing

fox drinks

spots a lynx

(unlikely),

best friends

will never end.

Clara age 8, Ilam School

 

Waiting

There is a boy waiting on  a fence.

Waiting, just waiting

for his father to come home.

There is a woman looking out a window down a gravel road

waiting.

Waiting for her lover to come home,

home from the horrible battlefield

 

There is a mother with wrinkles of age painted on her face

sitting on a porch rocking back and forth, waiting.

Waiting for a child to come home.

She waits for the horror to end.

 

Waiting just waiting.

 

For a son,

a husband,

a father,

a man.

Waiting, just waiting

for a loved one to come home.

Jackson, Y8, age 12, Chisnallwood Intermediate, Christchurch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

‘The Paula Green Method’: Something for me to think about and some poems from Russley School

Melanie works with a writing group at Russley School in Christchurch and sent in some poems which I really loved. So  I am going to share them with you.

But first …

Melanie also sent me on a fascinating train of thought as she said she used what she calls ‘The Paula Green Method.’ Which was rather cool but got me wondering if I do have a set method.

I guess there are some key things at work when I do poetry workshops.

I want children to fall in love with language and play.

Sometimes it can be a bit daunting to write a poem cold so we often go on word hunts. Which is what they did. There is no one way to do this but helps build a word field to play in.

I also strongly believe poetry can ignite the most reluctant writer and set them on all manner of discovery paths. Important!

Poetry can also challenge a sophisticated writer to take new risks.

I am more inclined to open doorways and paths than have a set goal in mind. If the child has sparked that is gold.

One day I need to down and write up the method(s) to my poetry madness!

I love the sound of these poems and the glorious detail. They are surprising. They build pictures and they build mood. I love the way they have played with how the poem sits on the page (form) and the way the lines move. Wonderful job! I am honoured you used a bit of my method to get here.

Here are the poems:

Screen shot 2015-04-01 at 1.22.01 PM Screen shot 2015-04-01 at 1.21.54 PM Screen shot 2015-04-01 at 1.21.45 PM Screen shot 2015-04-01 at 1.21.38 PM

To celebrate the past year on Poetry Box — Russley School’s performance on The Hot Spot Poetry Tour including Apirana Taylor’s ‘haka.’ Magnificent!

IMG_7681_1 Russley School hosted the Christchurch event of The Hot Spot Poetry Tour of NZ at their school. Many of their children performed in the programme. The whole event was glorious but so good to see their students on video. The event finished with their fabulous rendition of Apirana Taylor’s poem, ‘haka.’ You can watch the performance here.

Final Treasury Challenge Favourites: Using titles from The Treasury to make tremendous new poems

ATreasuryOfNZPoemsForChildrenJKT_FNL.indd

I had such fun reading all the poems that took a Treasury title as their starting point. Many of you know I collected titles for my next collection at all my events and school visits on my tour so I can’t wait to start writing those  .. but it won’t be until next year. Lots of writing projects for next year which I am very excited about.

I loved the way your poems took the title and then went off in all directions. Just what poems and poets like to do! Some played with how they looked and all sounded good! Lots of sizzling imagination too!

I LOVED all the poems you sent me, but I couldn’t post them all.  If you missed out this time do try again. I have picked Noah from Adventure School to send a copy of A Treasury of NZ Poems. Noah was inspired by Margaret Mahy’s poem, ‘The Dictionary Bird.’  His poem is full of delicious sounds and scrumptious words just as her poem is.  Congratulations to all the young poets.

Inspired by Harry Ricketts:

Screen shot 2014-11-24 at 6.10.12 PM

Inspired by Greg O’Connell:

Screen shot 2014-11-24 at 6.20.46 PM Screen shot 2014-11-24 at 6.22.35 PM Screen shot 2014-11-24 at 6.25.57 PM Screen shot 2014-11-24 at 6.23.37 PM

Inspired by Stephanie Mayne:

Screen shot 2014-11-24 at 6.29.47 PM

By Ollie, Year 6 aged 11, Gladstone Primary School, Auckland

Inspired by Bill Nagelkerke:

Screen shot 2014-11-25 at 11.53.02 AM

Inspired by Pauline Cartwright:

Spaghetti

Sloppy curly spaghetti

Very good for lunch

Yummy slurpy spaghetti

My brother goes munch

Toasty cheesy spaghetti

I love it in my tum

Messy messy spaghetti

Tum tum spaghetti yum yum

Ruby T age 6, Year 2, Ilam School

Spaghetti

Slippy spaghetti slides down my chin

Slimy spaghetti makes me grin

By Gemma and Daniel, Adventure School

Screen shot 2014-11-25 at 1.07.08 PM

Russley School sent in a bunch of terrific poems. Here are a few of my favourites:

Inspired by Roger Hall:

Screen shot 2014-11-25 at 11.24.38 AM

Inspired by Joy Cowley:

Screen shot 2014-11-25 at 11.25.06 AM

Inspired by Greg O’Connell:

Screen shot 2014-11-25 at 11.25.53 AM

Inspired by James K Baxter:

Screen shot 2014-11-25 at 11.27.11 AM

One Breath Poems (inspired by Greg O’Connell – to be recited in one breath!):

Screen shot 2014-11-25 at 11.28.00 AM

I also received a tremendous bunch of poems from Room 8 at Adventure School. Again it was very hard to pick just a few to post.

Inspired by Pauline Cartwright:

Screen shot 2014-11-25 at 11.35.19 AM

Inspired by Bill Nagelkerke:

Screen shot 2014-11-25 at 11.36.02 AM

Inspired by Peter Bland:

Screen shot 2014-11-25 at 11.36.58 AM

Inspired by Stephanie Mayne:

Screen shot 2014-11-25 at 11.39.06 AM

Inspired by Paula Green:

Screen shot 2014-11-25 at 11.40.38 AM

Inspired by Margaret Mahy:

Screen shot 2014-11-25 at 11.35.33 AM

Inspired by Greg O’Connell:

Screen shot 2014-11-25 at 11.46.51 AM

Inspired by David Hill:

Screen shot 2014-11-25 at 11.46.13 AM

The Treasury Interviews: Izak interviews David Eggleton

The interviewer:

My name is Izak, I am 9 years old. My hobbies are electronics, gardening and pottery. I also play the drums, basketball and soccer. I have a sister called Monica, and two cats called Ziggy and Mischief. My favourite author is Andy Griffiths and my favourite book is the 52 Storey Treehouse. I don’t like writing much, but I do like writing poems because they can be very short! (Note from Paula: I have seen some of Izak’s pottery and it is astonishingly good!)

T4 Izak Koster

The interviewed:

David Eggleton is  poet and writer who lives in Dunedin. His books include Time of the Icebergs, a collection of poems published in 2010. His new collection of poems, The Conch Trumpet, will be published by Otago University Press early in 2015.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

  1. What was your favourite book when you were a child?

I didn’t have a favourite book as a child, but I still remember my excitement at primary school when a teacher whose name I forget read Grimm Brothers fairytales to us every week for what seemed like a whole year, but was probably only a few weeks. There were scary but also really good. I had never heard anything like them before.

  1. What is your favourite book now?

One of my favourite books for a long time has been Moby Dick, by Herman Melville. It’s a story of a great white whale that turns on the American sailors who are hunting it and then destroys their ship. It tells you lots of things about whales, and also about whale-hunters.

  1. Do you have a favourite author?

No, I don’t have one favourite author, but I do have lots of favourite poets. Here are some of them: William Blake, Lewis Carroll, Hone Tuwhare, Wendy Cope, Emily Dickinson, James K. Baxter. They have all written some magical poems.

  1. How old were you when you did your first performance poetry event, and were you scared?

A poetry performance event is not quite the same as a poetry reading. I first learnt my poems off by heart, and then recited them on-stage in a break between two rock bands to a noisy crowd, when I was in my early twenties. I was a bit nervous, but most of the crowd liked it. That was my first poetry performance event.

  1. What was the first car you owned?

I used to own a Holden Belmont that was made in Australia. It had a powerful engine. I travelled all around New Zealand in that car.

  1. Did you like school?

I liked some subjects at school more than others. I liked music and English and art.

  1. Who was your favourite teacher and why?

I remember when I was at secondary school — I went to Aorere College in south Auckland — a teacher read out the poems of Gerard Manley Hopkins to us, and she made us study his poems very closely because he was her favourite poet. And he became a poet I liked, to the extent that that my poems are sometimes compared to his. So she — Mz Wellsford — would have to be one of my favourite teachers.

  1. What was the naughtiest thing that you ever did when you were a kid?

Well, there were many naughty things, but one of the most dangerous was when I was eight years old and me and my friends wandered, on a Sunday when it was closed, onto an air-force base firing range, looking for unexploded bullets which we could bash with rocks to make them explode. We were collecting bullet-shells and bullets, and we had just started smashing them with rocks and bits of wire and nails when we were caught, and not just chased off but escorted back home.

  1. Do you have any brothers or sisters, and have you ever written a poem about them?

I have one sister and two brothers. I have written poems about some members of my family and I hope eventually to write about all of them. One of my brothers is an artist, and we are working together at the moment on a collection of poems about animals of the South Pacific. He is making woodblock prints for my poems about whales and frogs and lizards and bats.

Thanks David and Izak for a great interview. David has a poem in The Treasury about bats, and having heard him read it in Dunedin, I can tell you it is an excellent poem to read out loud!

 

 

The Treasure Interviews: Monica interviews Adrienne Jansen

IMG_8764Monica

Monica Koster  I was born in Christchurch in 2002. My passions in life are running, writing and music. So far, I have published three different things. In 2010, when I was 8 years old, my earthquake poem was published on the NZEPC website along with Jeffrey Paparoa Holman’s. In 2013, I was published in the Margaret Mahy Governor’s Bay Poetry book when I won the Senior Poem with Illustration Competition. In 2014, I was excited and honoured to be published in Paula Green’s book, The Letter Box Cat.

Adrienne Jansen

The Score photo A Jansen

Adrienne Jansen writes poetry, fiction and non-fiction for children and
adults. In 2014 she edited The Curioseum, a collection of strange and
wonderful stories based on weird objects in Te Papa’s collections. She lives
in Titahi Bay, with a big ocean view and lots of wind. (note from Paula: I adore The Curioseum so much I posted about it on Poetry Box!)

  1. When you were younger, what was your favourite book character?

When I was a kid, I absolutely loved Ian Seraillier’s The Silver Sword and the family in that novel.

  1. When did you start writing?

When I was a kid. The Evening Post (which was a Wellington newspaper then) had a Children’s Page, and I started sending little things to it when I was about 8.

  1. Did you ever play a sport?

I played badminton a lot, bit of tennis, but my real love is swimming. In the sea and in the pool both.

  1. Who was the most interesting person you met in Canada?

Probably a man we met the summer we went to the Yukon. He’d been goldmining up there for years. They’re a different breed, people who live long periods of time in huge remote places like that.

  1. It must have been fun editing the book, The Curioseum. What was your favourite piece in it?

It was fun – and hard work both, because quite a few of those writers didn’t usually write for children, so the stories needed quite a lot of work. I don’t think I can pick a favourite – I like them all a lot, and the writers as well.

  1. What (or who) inspired you to write “‘Clean as a Whistle,’ I say. That’s what I want.” (I’m guessing it was your son! How did he feel about it?)

Yes it was our younger son. And that’s exactly what happened (except that he was cleaning the laundry floor and I made it the kitchen floor). But everything else is exactly as it happened. I didn’t read it to him for quite a long time, but then he thought it was very funny! It was very unusual for him to clean the floor – he must have wanted something!

  1. I like thinking up ideas for poems when I’m sitting high in a tree. Where is your favourite place to write?

We’ve got a little yard out the back of our house. It’s very sheltered (that matters at our house because we get a big sea wind), there are tuis everywhere now, and there’s a big chunky table and two benches. Every morning that it’s fine I have breakfast there, and more and more I write out there. But really I write any old place.

Thanks Monica and Adrienne for such a wonderful interview. I really loved reading this. Adrienne has two poems in The Treasury including one of my all-time favourite poems about the wind!

The_Curioseum_cover-197x300    The_Curioseum_cover-197x300   The_Curioseum_cover-197x300